Jill in the News

KWMU: Greitens’ relationship with the legislature could use some repair

By Jason Rosenbaum

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks to reporters after the 2017 adjourned. Greitens didn’t have the smoothest relationship with legislators — including Republicans that control both chambers of the Missouri General Assembly.
Carolina Hidalgo / St. Louis Pubic Radio

Eric Greitens’ successful campaign to become Missouri’s governor was based on the premise that politicians were ruining the state and that an outsider’s help was needed.

But with the 2017 legislative session in the books, some of the elected officials Greitens decried believe he got in their way and …

The Kansas City Star: 60,000 older Missourians to lose state aid for prescription drugs

By Jason Hancock
[email protected]

JEFFERSON CITY

Roughly 60,000 older Missourians will lose state aid to help them pay for prescription drugs starting in July.

But lawmakers hope the cut won’t be permanent.

Seniors who earn less than 85 percent of the federal poverty level, or roughly $10,000 a year for an individual, qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare. That entitles them to state aid for 100 percent of out-of-pocket costs on medications.

Those earning between 85 percent and 185 percent of the federal poverty level, or up to about $22,000 …

Missourinet: (AUDIO) Missouri Senator with tough exterior shows soft spot for law enforcement; Senators say Greitens’ PAC crossed the line

Those listening to Missouri Senate debate on Friday could hear a pin drop in the chamber when state Sen. Doug Libla (R-Poplar Bluff) tried to fight back tears and keep his composure. This legislative session, which has had its tumultuous and divisive ups and downs in recent weeks, showed a united front on Friday. Libla was discussing with Sen. Bob Dixon (R-Springfield) his support for law enforcement during debate about ethics legislation.

http://cdn.missourinet.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/liblaanddixon.mp3

Libla, who is viewed as one who firmly holds his ground, could not fathom …

Scripps Media: Missouri Lawmakers Pass $3.4B In Basic Aid For K-12 Schools

Bailey Strohl
12:27 AM, May 5, 2017

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri budgeters have agreed on a final version of the state’s proposed 27 billion dollar spending plan.

The plan needs a final vote of approval from the Legislature.

The proposal would increase basic aid for public K-12 schools, but cut funding for higher education and in-home care and nursing services for seniors and people with disabilities.

Creve Coeur Senator Jill Schupp criticized House Bill 10, a section that would cut critical funding from health care facilities that offer …

St. Louis Public Radio: Missouri House eyeing 1st-in-nation parental consent abortion provision

By Erica Hunzinger & Marshall Griffin

Updated 5:45 p.m., May 2, 2017, to correct headline and story that there is no 20-week ban amended to the underlying bill — The Missouri House approved an amendment Tuesday that would give Missouri a first-in-the-nation parental consent for minors provision and a ban on donating fetal tissue for research.

The abortion restrictions came in the form of an amendment to an underlying bill, which now goes to the House fiscal review committee for an estimate of how much it’ll cost with …

KBIA: Progress Stalls on Paid Parental Leave in the Missouri Legislature

By LUCILLA SHERMAN & Columbia Missourian • Apr 26, 2017

 

When Gov. Eric Greitens signed an executive order providing paid parental leave for the executive branch earlier this year, he encouraged lawmakers to extend those policies.

But with time running out in the legislative session, it’s unlikely Missourians will see expansion of those policies in the public or private sector.

“I still consider having a public discussion about it a win,” said Rep. Tracy McCreery, D-St. Louis, sponsor of one of the pending bills. “I think that …

The Missouri Times: New poll suggests voters could favor education savings accounts for school choice

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – A Senate bill geared toward providing Missouri families greater choice and flexibility regarding their children’s education has passed the state’s upper chamber. The Missouri Senate on Thursday advanced the legislation seeking to create education savings accounts in the Show-Me State but held back in granting an emergency clause.

SB 313, sponsored by Sen. Andrew Koenig, seeks to establish the Missouri Empowerment Scholarship Accounts Program, which would provide families the ability to choose their schools and use funds from education savings accounts …

The Missouri Times: Hourly Updates: Senate Budget

Wednesday, April 26, 2017
5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
House Bill 11 –Department of Social Services

The Senate continues debate on to HB 11.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
House Bill 11 –Department of Social Services

The Senate continues debate on to HB 11. Sen. Schaaf continues discussing managed care on the floor.
Sen. Libla turns discussion on the floor toward ethics, Schaaf talks of donations former Gov. Jay Nixon received from managed care companies
Sen. Bill Eigel also discusses ethics, says it would create a lot of goodwill with the Senate if …

St. Louis Post-Dispatch Political Fix: Lawmakers say lobbyist gift ban will likely fail again this year in Missouri

 

By Austin Huguelet • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Apr 24, 2017

JEFFERSON CITY • On the first day of this year’s legislative session, House Speaker Todd Richardson, a Republican, vowed to make restrictions on lobbyist gifts to legislators the first bill out of his chamber.

His side of the capitol made good on the promise, too, voting Rep. Justin Alferman’s measure out of committee at 7:30 a.m. on Inauguration Day, Jan. 9, and sending it to the Senate on Jan. 17 on a 149-5 vote. Alferman, R-Hermann, was finding …

Missourinet: Missouri State Senator says robocalls have ceased in her district

Democratic State Senator Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur says constituents are no longer contacting her office inquiring about robocalls linking her to the energy grid.

Senator Jill Schupp (D) (photo courtesy; Missouri Senate)

Her office received numerous phone calls late last week from confused constituents, with several of them saying the pre-recorded messages connected her with the grid.

She suspects lobbyists for the utility industry may have been behind the robocalls, and calls the effort dishonorable.

“For somebody to use that tactic …

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Messenger: In 2012, St. Louis County protected gays from discrimination. In 2017? Not so much.

By Tony Messenger St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In 2012, Steve Stenger took a stand for gay rights.

Then the chairman of the St. Louis County Council, Stenger helped orchestrate passage of a historic new ordinance which expanded discrimination protections to gays and lesbians in the county.

Stenger’s vote helped the proposal pass 4-3.

“I believe history shows us inclusive communities are successful communities,” he said.

Stenger is now county executive, and the ordinance is still the law of the land in St. Louis County.

But its spirit of inclusiveness doesn’t apply, apparently, …

The Kansas City Star: Gov. Eric Greitens’ reliance on ‘dark money’ drawing greater scrutiny from lawmakers

By Jason Hancock
[email protected]

As a nonprofit founded to promote Gov. Eric Greitens makes its first foray into Missouri politics, state lawmakers are increasingly raising alarms about the governor’s reliance on dark money.

The Missouri Senate voted 19-12 this week in support of a requirement that nonprofits engaging in political activity disclose their donors. The vote was largely ceremonial because the requirement was attached to a resolution urging states to convene a constitutional convention.

But with an ethics reform debate on the horizon, the vote demonstrates that Greitens’ use …

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Student transfer bill and tax credit scholarships move forward in Missouri Senate

 

By Celeste Bott St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Apr 11, 2017

JEFFERSON CITY • The Missouri Senate has advanced a package of school choice legislation, including a tax credit scholarship program and a resurrected measure modifying a law that allows students in unaccredited schools to transfer to better-performing school districts.

Lawmakers have sought to change the state’s transfer statute since 2014, when the Missouri Supreme Court upheld a statute giving thousands of students to the chance to transfer out of unaccredited Normandy and Riverview Gardens districts to higher-performing schools …

Joplin Globe: Missouri Senate prepares for battles on budget, drug monitoring program, state licenses

 

By Crystal Thomas [email protected]

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — With little bit more than a month left in the legislative session, the Missouri Senate will be making big decisions through ironing out compromises or busting through with the nuclear option.

Many of the House-passed bills will be in Senate committee hearings this week; less so, the reverse. In the last week, the Senate has been at a standstill, with controversial bills plugging up the pipeline.

Last Monday, Senate Republicans attempted to shepherd through a House bill that would pre-empt …

Missourian: Prescription Drug Monitoring Bills Moving Out of Senate

 

By Monte Miller, Missourian Staff Writer
Apr 8, 2017

A locally sponsored Senate bill establishing a prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) in Missouri is making progress in the general assembly and should be passed on to the House early next week.

Senate Bill 314, sponsored by State Sen. Dave Schatz, R-Sullivan, was placed on the informal calendar Thursday after being combined with a similar bill sponsored by his fellow St. Louis County Sen. Jill Schupp.

“I’m very positive,” Schatz said. “More and more counties are individually passing PDMP and …

STL Post-Dispatch: Crisis Nursery takes in big money, hands out top awards

 

By Joe Holleman St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Apr 7, 2017

The Crisis Nursery kicked off National Child Abuse Prevention Month last week at its Razzle Dazzle Ball in Maryland Heights. Some honorable hardware was distributed at the soiree:

Couple of the Year: Suzanne and John Carney. The KTRS-AM 550 host and his wife have through their foundation donated tens of thousands of dollars to help the nursery.

 

Legislator of the Year: State Sen. Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur, a longtime member of the nursery’s advisory board.

 

Young Professional Hero Awards: Former KMOV …

St. Louis Public Radio: Goodbye to all that? Missouri lawmakers dragging feet on lobbyist-gift ban

By Marshall Griffin

Free stuff from lobbyists — anything from free meals to concert and game tickets to trips abroad — are part of the perks of being a lawmaker.

Such gifts, though, have been on the chopping block for a couple of years, with Missouri Republican legislative leaders and now Gov. Eric Greitens looking to ban them. In the face of last year’s failed efforts to ban lobbyist gifts, Greitens took quick action once in office.

“I signed an executive order banning gifts from lobbyists to state …

St. Louis Public Radio: On the Trail: Taking the temperature of the legislature on paid parental leave

By Jason Rosenbaum

With Gov. Eric Greitens issuing an executive order extending parental leave to some state employees, the question naturally arises: What’s next?

While important to the thousands of state employees it affects, the Republican governor’s executive order is not comprehensive. It provides paid time off for people who give birth or adopt a child, but only applies to “executive” state agencies run by gubernatorial appointees. It doesn’t affect private sector workers — or every state employee.

To expand the policy beyond executive agencies, the legislature would have to …

Springfield News-Leader: Legislative roundup: Lawmakers vote to expand charter schools, cut tax credit for elderly

Will Schmitt , [email protected]

JEFFERSON CITY — The legislative spring break next week marks the halfway point in the first legislative session of a Republican-controlled era in Missouri politics.

The session will continue until mid-May, and odds are low that lawmakers will reconvene for a lengthy veto session. As planned, the GOP majorities in both chambers have moved with confidence to reform laws governing labor, civil courts and education, knowing that what they pass is likely to be signed by fellow Republican Gov. Eric Greitens.

Legislative leaders met with reporters Thursday …

Associated Press: Paid parental leave for state workers considered in Missouri

By KATIE KULL Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.

Missouri lawmakers are pushing to give all state workers paid parental leave after Republican Gov. Eric Greitens signed an order that provides the benefit to some executive branch employees so they can bond with a newborn or adopted child.

Greitens’ order giving up to six weeks of additional paid leave to primary caregivers and three weeks to secondary caregivers applies to workers in the governor’s office and all agencies controlled by one of his appointees. The Missouri Department of …

STL Public Radio: At the halfway mark, Missouri GOP legislators tout session’s successes — and promise more

By Marshall Griffin

Missouri lawmakers wrapped up the first half of the 2017 legislative session having achieved the session’s top priority: making Missouri a right-to-work state.

Gov. Eric Greitens, a Republican, signed Senate Bill 19 into law last month. It bars labor unions and employers from requiring workers to pay dues and fees as a condition for employment.

Legislators also sent House Bill 153 to the governor, which he’s expected to sign. It defines more strictly who qualifies as an expert witness, part of an overall strategy to …

STL Post-Dispatch: MoDOT expands paid parental leave, legislators mull their own plans

By Austin Huguelet St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • The Missouri Department of Transportation announced Thursday it would be following Gov. Eric Greitens’ lead in expanding paid parental leave to its employees.

Primary caregivers will receive six weeks of paid leave following a birth or adoption; secondary caregivers will get three weeks.

The move is identical to an executive order Greitens issued Monday extending the benefits to all state executive branch employees under his control or the purview of his appointees. 

 

Greitens’ order did not apply to MoDOT, an agency led by …

Springfield News-Leader: Lawmakers move to require suicide prevention training for counselors, social workers

Will Schmitt , [email protected] 10:36 p.m. CT March 13, 2017

JEFFERSON CITY — Sen. Jeanie Riddle couldn’t believe what Jane Smith was telling her about suicide training in Missouri.

Smith, a mental health counselor and life crisis director with St. Louis-based Provident, oversees a hotline people can call if they’re thinking about committing suicide or if they see risk signs in others. She and other mental health care advocates are pushing for psychologists, behavior analysts, marriage counselors and social workers to be required to take …

Ozark Radio News: Missouri Senate approves bill on illegal reentry

 (Jefferson City) – Part of Tuesday afternoon is spent talking about what to do with certain criminals who commit felonies in our state.

Senator Mike Cunningham (R-Rogersville) sponsors Senate Bill 34, legislation that would create the crime of illegal reentry. He told colleagues one change has been made to what was introduced last year:

During discussion, Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) adds she believes more legislation is growing out of fear:

Senate Bill 34 has been given preliminary Missouri Senate approval. The measure would need another positive vote …

Missourinet: MO Senate Close to Passing Bill to Stiffen Penalties Against Undocumented Criminals

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — (Missourinet) The state Senate has passed a proposal to increase punishment for undocumented immigrants who commit crimes.

Under the measure, people deported for committing a crime who re-enter Missouri and commit a violent crime are charged with a new offense called “Illegal Re-entry”.

The penalty would be a class C felony, with imprisonment from three to ten years.  Rogersville Republican Mike Cunningham, who sponsored the measure, says it’s been misunderstood.

“We’re not targeting people that have overstayed their visa, or who are productive members …

STL Post-Dispatch: Missouri Senate again targets deportees in crime bill

By Kurt Erickson St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • The Missouri Senate is again trying to create the crime of “illegal reentry” in the state.

Under legislation now advancing to the House, if a person is deported from the United States for committing a crime and then returns and commits a felony, they also would be guilty of illegal reentry in Missouri. 

The offense would be a class C felony, punishable by three to seven years.

The measure won approval Thursday on a 27-6 vote. Similar legislation moved through the Senate …

The Associated Press: Missouri bill on deported immigrants gets initial approval

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.

Missouri senators have given initial approval to a bill that would crack down on some immigrants living in the country illegally.

Senators voted 26-3 Tuesday in favor of the bill. It needs another vote of approval to move to the House.

If it passes the Legislature and becomes law, deported immigrants who come back and commit assaults and dangerous felony offenses would face three to 10 years in prison.

Republican Sen. Mike Cunningham says his goal is to crack down on criminals. He says workers …

Associated Press: Missouri lawmakers push charter school expansion

March 6, 2017

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri lawmakers are pushing to expand charter schools around the state — a move that advocates say would lead to innovation in the classroom, but that critics say may do little to improve student achievement.

Missouri law allows charters to operate independently of local districts only in Kansas City and St. Louis, where charters have received a mixed bag of performance scores. Bills working their way through the Missouri Legislature would expand that process to the rest of state, …

Associated Press: Missouri lawmakers push charter school expansion

JEFFERSON CITY (AP) — Missouri lawmakers are pushing to expand charter schools around the state — a move that advocates say would lead to innovation in the classroom, but that critics say may do little to improve student achievement.

Missouri law allows charters to operate independently of local districts only in Kansas City and St. Louis, where charters have received a mixed bag of performance scores. Bills working their way through the Missouri Legislature would expand that process to the rest of state, where charter schools …

The Kansas City Star: Employment discrimination bill clears major hurdle in Missouri Senate

By Jason Hancock
[email protected]

JEFFERSON CITY

A bill that would make it more difficult to prove discrimination cases against former employers won initial approval early Wednesday morning in the Missouri Senate.

Shortly after 2 a.m., the Senate approved a scaled-back version of the legislation that requires workers who claim discrimination in wrongful termination lawsuits to prove that bias was a “motivating” factor. The current standard requires them to prove only that it was a “contributing” factor.

Senate Republicans originally were pushing for a requirement that workers prove that …

St. Louis Jewish Light: Jews in the News: March 1, 2017

Democratic Missouri State Sen. Jill Schupp received the first Betty Sims Mental Health Advocacy Award for her recent legislation that mandates all Missouri school districts to provide suicide prevention/intervention training to administration and staff. This award was established by Provident, a mental health service organization, to honor Sen. Sims’ efforts to improve mental health services in Missouri. 

STL Post-Dispatch: Suing for discrimination at work gets harder under measure OK’d by Missouri Senate

By Austin Huguelet St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • After more than 12 hours of debate and filibuster that stretched into the early morning Wednesday, Missouri senators reached a compromise on a proposal that would make it harder for Missourians to sue for workplace discrimination. 

Under a measure given initial approval after midnight, people would have to prove their race, sex or other protected status actually motivated their boss or colleague to mistreat them to win cases like wrongful termination suits. 

Currently, they need only prove their status was …

Empower Missouri: NAACP and allies decry 1st round approval of pro-discrimination bill; ask senators to reverse course

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo……….Representatives of NAACP, Empower Missouri, labor unions, and Missouri Faith Voices joined today to denounce first round approval of Senate Bill 43 by the Missouri Senate at around 3 a.m. after a period of extended debate on multiple days. “Senate Bill 43 flies in the face of our faith and traditional American values of equality and justice for all,” said Nimrod Chapel, Jr., president of NAACP in Missouri.  “Hard-working Missourians deserve to know that the state of Missouri has their back when they …

St. Louis Public Radio: Missouri NAACP leader again speaks out against workplace discrimination bills

Originally published on February 28, 2017 5:17 pm

Two weeks after Missouri NAACP President Nimrod Chapel was silenced by a House Republican committee chairman on bills he believes are discriminatory, he stood at the Missouri Capitol to decry the “hyped-up Jim Crow” measures that are “fundamentally flawed.”

A day after after he wasn’t allowed to speak at the Feb. 13 hearing, Chapel said House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, told him the chamber was not at its best and assured Chapel he’d be given the opportunity to …

Springfield News-Leader: Legislative roundup: What’s next on REAL ID, drug monitoring and ‘abortion museum’

JEFFERSON CITY — Legislative leaders regularly speak with members of the Capitol press corps after adjournment on Thursdays. The press conferences allow lawmakers from both major parties to deliver their takes on the events of the past few days and outline their hopes for the week ahead. Here’s a sampling of what went down this week in Jefferson City:

 
 
 

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Readers have asked the News-Leader for more information about the fate of legislation to bring Missouri into compliance with the federal REAL ID of 2005. …

The Kansas City Star: Abortion exhibit — that’s what Missouri Capitol museum needs, lawmaker says

By Allison Pecorin
[email protected]

JEFFERSON CITY

On a walk through the first-floor Missouri State Museum in the Capitol building, visitors see tributes to Missouri industry, veterans, Native Americans and slavery.

If Rep. Mike Moon has his way, right next to those exhibits will be one on the history of abortion.

 

 
Rep. Mike Moon

Moon, an Ash Grove Republican, on Wednesday introduced the “Never Again Act,” which proposes that an exhibit showcasing abortion tools be added to the Capitol museum.

The legislation specifies that this exhibit must be near …

The Missouri Times: Moon wants to create ‘History of Abortion’ exhibit in Capitol

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.  – State Rep. Mike Moon, R-Ash Grove, this week filed HB 1014, which seeks to add an exhibit on the history of abortion to the state museum.

Legislation filed by Rep. Mike Moon seeks to have a ‘History of Abortion’ exhibit created near the existing exhibit displaying the state’s history of slavery.

Called the “Never Again Act,” the legislation directs the created exhibit to be placed near the existing exhibit displaying the state’s history of slavery.

Moon has been a staunch …

Ladue News: Spirit of Provident Gala

Honoring the dedication and compassion of community members was a centerpiece of the 2017 Spirit of Provident Gala at the Four Seasons Hotel in downtown St. Louis. The Spirit of Provident award was bestowed on Ambassador George (Bert) Walker III and his wife Carol for their generous service and unwavering commitment to the community. This was followed by cocktails, a silent auction, and dinner.

Missouri Senator Jill Schupp was awarded the Betty Sims Mental Health Advocacy Award for work on recent legislation mandating that school districts …

Missouri Times: Progressive legislators turn to podcasts to spread message

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Democratic legislators in both chambers have decided to take the airwaves in what has recently become a much more conventional method of communication: podcasting.

Kansas City Democrats Rep. Lauren Arthur and Jon Carpenter launched their podcast, Podgressive, releasing the first episode on Soundcloud Sunday. Arthur and Carpenter discussed the national, state and local-level politics in Kansas City. It can be heard below.

The idea came to the two from their conversations over the course of their time in the General Assembly. Carpenter said …

Ozark Radio News: Missouri Senate approves health care lawsuit legislation

February 16, 2017

(Jefferson City) – This week in the Missouri Senate began with discussion of Senate Bill 237, a measure that would change the definitions of “employee” and “physician employee” in actions against health care providers for personal injury or death.
Henry & Williams Oct 2016

Bill sponsor Sen. Caleb Rowden (R-Columbia) tells his colleagues the term “physician employee” was defined, but not used, in the 2005 law. He says a judge picked up on this in a 2014 court decision:

During discussion, Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) …

Missourinet: Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Moving Through Legis. Again

Posted: Feb 13, 2017 12:40 PM CST
Updated: Feb 13, 2017 12:40 PM CST

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — A state Senate panel recently took the unusual step of debating a proposal and approving it during the same hearing.

The measure would dismiss Missouri from carrying the distinction of being the only state in the country without a prescription drug monitoring program.

All 49 other states already have such systems in place for reducing prescription drug abuse and illegal distribution.

Senate Democrat Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur says the absence of …

Missourinet: Missouri Representative to propose expansion of gun rights for some Capitol visitors

February 9, 2017 By Alisa Nelson

Signs have been posted at some Missouri Capitol entrances stating concealed carry permit holders can now bring guns inside, but firearms are prohibited in legislative chambers and hearing rooms. State Rep. Nick Marshall (R-Parkville) is pleased with the change, but thinks citizens should also be able to take guns into those areas currently restricted.

“I’m certainly happy that the law is being followed now. Let’s not be hypocrites. Let’s not create a special political class that has its own safe …

The Missouri Times: Galloway announces new policy to cover domestic violence-related leave for employees

State Auditor calls on all state elected officials and government leaders to guarantee personnel policies cover domestic violence-related incidents

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway is looking to protect employees in domestic violence situations. This week, the top-ranking Democrat in statewide office put in place new policies in her office that ensure domestic violence is covered as a category for leave under existing workplace protections.

Galloway says the change in policy is designed to protect the employees in her office and is encouraging all …

Vital Voice: Missouri Nondiscrimination Act Introduced In the House & Senate for the 19th Year in a Row

For the 19th year in a row the Missouri Nondiscrimination Act (MONA) has been filed in the Missouri House and Senate. This legislation was first introduced by Steve McLuckie in 1998.

MONA would add sexual orientation and gender identity to Missouri’s Human Rights Act, which currently prohibits discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations for other protected categories, including race, sex, and national origin.

The two sponsors of MONA in the House are both openly gay. HB 485 is sponsored by Rep. Randy D. Dunn, and …

The Missouri Times: With right-to-work done, Rehder moves on to PDMP legislation

Travis Zimpfer

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Right-to-work has preoccupied Rep. Holly Rehder, R-Sikeston, for the first month of session, but now that Gov. Eric Greitens has signed the monumental piece of legislation, she will move onto her next major legislative priority: initiating a prescription drug monitoring program in Missouri.

For the third year in a row, Rehder will carry legislation designed to implement such a plan in the state. Like last year’s bill, this version of the bill, called the Narcotics Control Act, will monitor the prescription …

KMOV: Bill introduced to give unpaid leave to victims of domestic and sexual violence

By Alexis Zotos, Reporter

ST LOUIS (KMOV.com) – A new bill introduced at the St. Louis Board of Alderman meeting would require employers to grant employees two weeks unpaid leave if they are a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

Alderwoman Megan-Ellyia Green filed the bill that mirrors a bill filed earlier this month on the state level that would allow the employee to take time off to take care of things like going to court or seeking counseling.

A survivor of domestic assault who was …

Missourinet: Tensions run high over abortion proposal in Missouri legislature

January 25, 2017 By Jason Taylor

Missouri lawmakers are considering a far reaching proposal dealing with abortion.

Among other things, the measure requires the Department of Health and Human Services to conduct annual, unannounced, on-site inspections and investigations of abortion facilities.

Currently, the Planned Parenthood clinic in St. Louis is the state’s only abortion provider.

During a legislative hearing, the proposal’s sponsor, Republican Senator Bob Onder of Lake St. Louis and Democrat Jill Schupp of Creve Couer exchanged sharp words when Schupp inquired about inspections of ambulatory surgery …

STL Public Radio: On the Trail: A peek inside a political reporter’s notebook

By Jason Rosenbaum

In just three weeks, Missouri saw the installation of a GOP legislative supermajority, the inauguration of Republican statewide officials and Gov. Eric Greitens’ first State of the State address. These ceremonies came as Missouri’s political leaders appear ready to pass seismic policy changes – and deal with a worsening budget situation.

As is customary when I spent time at Missouri’s beautiful Capitol, I pulled together some odds and ends to provide a bit more context about the big-ticket items on the state’s legislative and …

Columbia Missourian: Senate members hear testimony on abortion-related bills

BY SKY CHADDE Jan 18, 2017

JEFFERSON CITY — State senators heard testimony on several bills Wednesday relating to abortion — or, as Republican State Sen. David Sater said, “pro-life bills.”

The bills would, among other things, clarify protection for clinics that offer alternatives to abortion, seek to ensure there would never be a black market for fetal tissue and prevent women from aborting a fetus based on sex, race or if the baby has Down syndrome — the constitutionality of which one senator said is …

Missourinet: Missouri Lawmakers Look at Proposal to Protect Anti Abortion Pregnancy Centers

Published 01/18 2017 04:15PM Updated 01/18 2017 04:15PM

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.–Missouri lawmakers are reviewing a proposal to permit what are being referred to as “alternatives to abortion” agencies to engage in religious practices and speech without government interference.

The measure is meant to block ordinances, such as one being considered in St. Louis, which would penalize the centers for refusing to hire people who might recommend an abortion.

Diane Vaughn heads an “alternatives to abortion” agency called Thrive St. Louis. She says the ordinance, if enacted, …

STL Post-Dispatch Political Fix: Senate bill could block proposed changes to St. Louis discrimination ordinance

By Celeste Bott St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • A Senate measure aimed at protecting alternative-to-abortion agencies could serve as a roadblock to a St. Louis bill that would add “reproductive health decisions” to the city’s anti-discrimination ordinance.

Filed by Alderman Megan-Ellyia Green, board bill 203 expands discrimination protections to include “any decision related to the use or intended use of a particular drug, device or medical service, including the use or intended use of contraception or fertility control or the planned or intended initiation or termination …

Springfield News Leader: Rebuilding Missouri’s Medicaid system could cut costs but increase uncertainty

Will Schmitt , [email protected] 6:02 a.m. CT Jan. 14, 2017
JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri could rebuild its Medicaid system with passage of a bill that aims to soothe the state’s budget woes. But the move could decrease options for those enrolled in the entitlement program.

The proposal, known as Senate Bill 28, was heard by the Senate’s Seniors, Families and Children Committee on Tuesday. Filed by committee chair Sen. David Sater, the bill would require the state Department of Social Services to ask the federal government for …

STL Jewish Light: Milestone for Jews in Missouri politics

State welcomes first Jewish governor with inauguration of Eric Greitens
By David Baugher, Special to the Jewish Light

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — For the first time in its nearly two centuries of statehood, Missouri has inaugurated a person of Jewish faith as its governor.

“The people have spoken and a new direction has been decided,” said Eric Greitens, moments after being sworn in. “For decades, Missourians have talked about change. Now it’s time to fight for that change.”

Greitens, 42, became the state’s 56th governor during ceremonies on the …

Columbia Missourian: Medicaid proposal would change federal funding, give state more control

Jack Morrisroe/Missourian Statehouse Correspondent

JEFFERSON CITY — Republican lawmakers, seeking a way to limit Medicaid costs, are trying to take more state control of how that money is spent in Missouri.

Proposed legislation would ask the federal government to give a lump sum of Medicaid funds to Missouri, rather than paying for each person in the state program. The move would allow the state to have more autonomy in how the money is dispersed.

“This open-ended entitlement has resulted in runaway spending that is bankrupting this …

Kansas City Star: Paid time off for childbirth proposed for Missouri state workers

By Jason Hancock

[email protected]

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State employees in Missouri are the lowest paid in the nation, and lawmakers have struggled for years to give them a raise.

With a tough budget year on the horizon, a …

Missourinet: AAA Pushes for Ban on Texting While Driving in Missouri

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — An automotive group wants state lawmakers to ban texting while driving in Missouri. Currently, people 21 and older are allowed to text behind the wheel.

Mike Right with AAA Missouri thinks the concept of restricting the practice by age doesn’t make sense. “The whole notion is idiotic” said Right. “The age is not an issue. It’s the distraction associated with texting that’s the issue. It’s not related to any age.”

AAA has supported all proposals in the legislature …

STL Jewish Light: Religion and politics

Ellen Futterman, Editor | 0 comments

Religion and politics

Rabbi James Bennett of Congregation Shaare Emeth has been invited to participate in the Jan. 9 inauguration of Missouri Governor-elect Eric Greitens, who is a Republican and grew up in the Jewish faith. Bennett will offer the benediction at the conclusion of the swearing-in ceremony in Jefferson City, and also will participate in the interfaith prayer service at St. Peter’s Church, the morning of the inauguration.
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“As soon as the governor was elected I sent an email to …

Kansas City Star: Missouri Gov.-elect Eric Greitens’ new hire faced sexual harassment allegations at Huffington Post

By Jason Hancock

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Gov.-elect Eric Greitens’ decision to hire a former Huffington Post editor who has faced sexual harassment accusations is drawing criticism from Missouri Democrats.

Jimmy Soni was managing editor of the liberal …

KSPR ABC 33: Bill to ban texting while driving in Missouri to be considered

By Frances Watson/Lance Green |
Posted: Mon 11:47 PM, Dec 19, 2016

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. One senator wants to outlaw texting while driving in Missouri.

Experts say, if a driver is traveling 55 miles per hour, looking down at a cell phone for even 5 seconds, the car will travel the length of a football field. Not paying attention for even that short amount of time can be dangerous.

“If you pull out in front of me or you hit me, I’m not so worried about the damage you did …

St. Louis Jewish Light: Missouri legislators visit Israel on Federation mission

By Eric Berger, Staff Writer | 0 comments

A group of Missouri legislators traveled to Israel last week amidst a cloud of uncertainty about the impact of a Donald Trump presidency on U.S.-Israel relations and American Jews.

The week-long trip, sponsored by Jewish Federation of St. Louis, included six Republican and two Democrat state senators and representatives.

State Sen. Jill Schupp (D-St. Louis County) and State Rep. Jay Barnes (R-Cole County) participated in a discussion with members of the Caucus on Israel- U.S. relations in the Knesset.

The …

Press Release via The Missouri Times: Release: Schupp prioritizes families, seniors, children in 2017 legislative session

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, today pre-filed 10 bills for the 2017 legislative session. The 10 bill package serves to enhance protections for the safety, health, well-being, and economic success of Missourians, with an emphasis on families, seniors, and children.

“Elected officials have the ability and moral obligation to help create an environment that allows Missourians opportunities to succeed,” Schupp said. “My pre-filed legislation addresses such critical issues as achieving financial equity and security; living in a safe and healthy environment; and …

STL Jewish Light: Washington University Hillel to host gun violence panel

Posted: Thursday, November 24, 2016 4:00 pm

Washington University’s Hillel Leadership Council student organization, in partnership with WashU Hillel, will convene a panel to discuss gun violence and gun control in the United States and St. Louis at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 28 at the WashU Hillel building, 6300 Forsyth Blvd. Panelists will include Missouri State Sen. Jill Schupp, University City law enforcement officer Jake Michael, WashU College Republicans President Ruben Schukit, and Allie Liss, a student intern with the Gun Violence Initiative of WashU’s Institute …

Rewire: Missouri Lawmaker Looks to Repeal Anti-Choice Laws in 2017

Nov 23, 2016, 5:13pm Teddy Wilson

State Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) told Missourinet that the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt striking down parts of Texas omnibus anti-choice law HB 2 motivated her to introduce the legislation.

A Missouri lawmaker plans to introduce bills to repeal policies restricting access to abortion care in the state, when the legislative session begins on January 4.

State Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) told Missourinet that the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Whole Woman’s Health v. …

Missourinet: Senator to File Bills to Change Missouri’s Abortion Clinic Laws

Published 11/22 2016 08:25AM
Updated 11/22 2016 08:25AM

CREVE COEUR, Mo. — State Senator Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) plans to sponsor legislation next session that would undo some of Missouri’s abortion regulations.

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June has prompted Schupp to spearhead the measures. The nation’s highest court struck down Texas’ abortion clinic laws that require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and for clinics to meet standards of an outpatient surgical center.

“Now that we’ve had that precedent spelled out …

KTTS: Missouri Abortion Laws Debated Again In January

By: John Thomas
Posted: 5:49 PM, Nov 21, 2016

A Missouri state lawmaker wants to change Missouri abortion laws.

Creve Coeur Senator Jill Schupp says, “We have some provisions in Missouri law that I know are absolutely obstacles put in place in order to prevent or make it very, very difficult for a woman to access her reproductive rights.”

Schupp plans to sponsor legislation next session that would undo some abortion regulations.

“Those include a 72-hour waiting period,” says Schupp, “and a requirement a physician have privileges at a nearby …

KMOV: Creve Coeur senior center honors veterans ahead of their Honor Flight trip

Posted: Nov 11, 2016 3:47 PM CST
Updated: Nov 11, 2016 3:47 PM CST
By Claire Kellett, Anchor / Reporter
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KMOV

CREVE COEUR, Mo. (KMOV.com) — In a special ceremony Friday, Brookdale Senior Living in Creve Coeur honored all of it’s World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam veterans.

“Thrilled to be alive, thrilled to be with a bunch of gentleman, thrilled to go on Honor Flight tomorrow,” said World War II veteran Al Katz.

About to turn 95, he can’t wait to take the Honor Flight to Washington DC Saturday …

Jewish In St. Louis: WashU Hillel to Host Gun Violence Panel

Posted on Nov 17, 2016

Washington University’s Hillel Leadership Council student organization, in partnership with WashU Hillel, will convene a panel to discuss gun violence and gun control in the United States and St. Louis on Monday, November 28 at 7:00 pm at the WashU Hillel building (6300 Forsyth Blvd. 63105). Panelists will include Jill Schupp, Missouri State Senator (D); Ruben Schukit, WU ’18, President of WashU’s College Republicans; Allie Liss, WU ’18, a student intern with the Gun Violence Initiative of WashU’s Institute …

STL Public Radio: Veterans History Project Hopes To Expand, Faces Financial Hurdles

By Tim Lloyd • May 26, 2013

Sidney Maltzman can vividly remember walking into an ambush in Eisenberg Germany.

“It was a trap,” Maltzman said. “We went in unknowing into this open field, the tanks were waiting for us.”

In an instant, the thud and zip of German tank and machine gun fire rained down on soldiers crossing an open field.

“Everyone in front of me got hit, and I said ‘let’s go!’” said Maltzman, a soon to be 88-year-old veteran living in Chesterfield.

Maltzman tossed a smoke …

STL Post-Dispatch: Messenger: St. Louis girls team breaks through the coding gender barrier

By Tony Messenger St. Louis Post-Dispatch 7 hrs ago (4)

When Bella Moak describes her GlobalHack VI experience, she does so in broad, life-altering terms.

“It felt really empowering,” says the 15-year-old sophomore at Visitation Academy.

As the only all-girls team at the worldwide coding competition held at Chaifetz Arena last month, Bella and her middle-school and high-school teammates stood out in a space filled with more than 1,000 bright and ambitious students and professionals.

In the end, they won first place in the youth division and second …

WUSTL’s The Source: Brown School veteran helping other vets help themselves

McCaskill, panel of veterans gather for largest Veterans Day event in recent university history
By Diane Toroian Keaggy October 31, 2016

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Petersen hands out Jolly Ranchers to Iraqi children in 2003.
Petersen hands out Jolly Ranchers to Iraqi children in 2003. (Photo: Courtesy of …

Missourinet: Eastern Missouri health fair includes free flu shots and health screenings

October 6, 2016 By Alisa Nelson

Free flu shots and vision and blood pressure screenings are being offered this Saturday at a St. Louis area health fair that’s hosted by some state lawmakers. Senator Jill Schupp (D- Creve Coeur), Representatives Sue Allen (R-Town and Country), Dean Plocher (R-Des Peres), Deb Lavender (D-Kirkwood), Tracy McCreery (D-Olivette), Mary Nichols (D-Maryland Heights) and Clem Smith (D-Velda Village Hills) are leading the event. Schupp says she’s proud of the bi-partisan support for the “Care Fair”.
Senator Jill Schupp (D) (photo …

STL Public Radio: Tuesday: Free-to-all healthcare fair in Overland slated for this weekend

By Kelly Moffitt

This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” at noon on Tuesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Tuesday’s St. Loui s on the Air, we’ll hear from Missouri Senator Jill Schupp about a healthcare fair in the 24th Missouri Senatorial district. There was a strong bipartisan effort behind the fair.

The event is open to all and will provide, free of charge, blood pressure and vision screenings, flu shots, health insurance navigation and resources from …

The Pitch: St. Louis Post-Dispatch switches position (again!) on cigarette tax

David Martin
Sep 27, 2016

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch has rescinded its decision to rescind support for the constitutional amendment to raise the cigarette tax in Missouri by 60 cents a pack.

On Monday, the paper published an editorial encouraging voters to say yes to Amendment 3, a ballot question to raise the nation’s lowest tobacco tax. Childhood health and education programs would receive most of the money from the new tax, estimated at $300 million a year.

The P-D has come full circle on Amendment 3. The paper …

Ozark Radio News: MO bills missed out on this session include death penalty, gender discrimination

(Jefferson City) – Most of the bills introduced in the Missouri Legislature this year didn’t go as far as supporters would have hoped.
Henry & Williams

Senate Bill 816 would have repealed the death penalty in Missouri. Senator Paul Wieland (R-Imperial) presented his measure to the Senate General Laws and Pensions Committee on January 19:

Meanwhile, Senate Bill 653 would have banned gender discrimination in the Show-Me State. The measure was heard in the Senate Progress and Development Committee, on which Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) serves, on …

St. Louis Public Radio: On the Trail: Franks says legal fight against Hubbard isn’t a case for photo ID

Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

It didn’t take a particularly long time before the legal showdown between Bruce Franks and Penny Hubbard became a rationale for a photo identification requirement. The disputed 78th District House race became part of the discourse to override a gubernatorial veto of photo ID legislation — especially after the publication of a St. Louis Post-Dispatch article detailing potential absentee ballot irregularities.

“The arguments that the governor made are extremely invalid,” said state Rep. Justin Alferman, …

STL Today: St. Louis County lawmaker vows to continue push for a ban on texting while driving

By Celeste Bott St. Louis Post-Dispatch
JEFFERSON CITY • More than 100 laws took effect in Missouri this week, but for another year, a statewide ban on texting while driving isn’t among them.

In 2009, the Missouri legislature passed a ban for drivers 21 and under, but after several attempts, no stricter legislation has made it past committee. Missouri is one of only four states – the others including Arizona, Montana and Texas – that don’t ban texting for all drivers.

“It seems like such a no-brainer, doesn’t …

St. Louis Public Radio: http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/residents-demand-epa-fully-remove-radioactive-waste-west-lake-landfill#stream/0

By Eli Chen

Residents and local officials continued to press the Environmental Protection Agency for full removal of radioactive waste at the West Lake Landfill Superfund site in Bridgeton at a meeting on Monday night.
Activist group Soul Much Water, who supports Just Moms STL, held a protest outside the Bridgeton Community Center on Monday evening.
Credit Eli Chen

By December, the federal agency must decide between four possible remedies for handling the radioactive contamination. The EPA could take no action, cap the waste in place, partial remove it …

Jewish Community Relations Council and Holocaust Museum and Learning Center co-Sponsor Program To Increase Awareness Around the LGBTQIA Community

Posted on Aug 12, 2016
photo-of-Jill-Schupp

Jewish Community Relations Council and Holocaust Museum and Learning Center co-Sponsor Program To Increase Awareness Around the LGBTQIA Community

A group of LGBTQIA+ and faith leaders were convened by the Diversity Awareness Partnership to assess the St. Louis community’s needs in the aftermath of the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando in June of 2016. After the first meeting, leaders agreed that exploring the idea of a free community-wide symposium would help increase education and awareness about the LGBTQIA community for allies …

St. Louis Jewish Light: St. Louis kicks off Maccabi Games in style

By Hannah Snidman, Staff Writer | 0 comments

A sea of blue “Host Family” T-shirts swarmed into Chaifetz Arena Sunday night in anticipation of the 2016 JCC Maccabi Games Opening Ceremony. The crowd numbered between 4,500 and 5,000 people, according to organizers.

The host families and spectators modeled lanyards with blue papers around their necks, while athletes displayed neon green ones. I felt lucky to have obtained a rare red credential, worn only by organizing committee and VIP members as well as the press.

This golden ticket …

Missourinet: Missouri Democrats to seek repeal of abortion clinic laws, Republican counsel says attempt will ‘go nowhere’

July 14, 2016 By Mike Lear

Missouri legislative Democrats say they’ll seek a repeal of the state’s abortion clinic laws in light of a Supreme Court ruling, but an attorney for Senate Republicans says there’s no reason for that attempt to go anywhere.
Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur)

Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur)

The U.S. Supreme Court two weeks ago struck down Texas laws requiring abortion clinics there to meet the standards of ambulatory surgical centers, and requiring abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a local hospital. Missouri …

STL Post-Dispatch: Democratic lawmakers look to repeal abortion restrictions after Supreme Court ruling

By Celeste Bott St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Three Democratic lawmakers vowed Wednesday to file bills that would get rid of two longstanding abortion restrictions after the Supreme Court struck down similar rules in Texas.

At issue are laws that hold abortion clinics to the same safety standards as outpatient surgical centers and require doctors who perform abortions to have privileges at a nearby hospital. Missouri was the first state in the nation to adopt both, in 1986 and 2005, respectively.

Supporters say the restrictions protect women’s …

St. Louis Jewish Light: Town hall to look at St. Louis Jewish community response to Ferguson report

Posted: Wednesday, July 13, 2016 4:00 pm

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Jews United for Justice and other St. Louis groups have planned “Forward Through Ferguson: The Jewish Community Response,” a social justice town hall meeting, for 6:45 p.m. Monday, July 18 at Congregation B’nai Amoona, 324 S. Mason Road in Creve Coeur.

Speakers will include State Sen. Jill Schupp, National Council of Jewish Women-St. Louis Section Executive Director Ellen Alper and Rabbi Josef Davidson of B’nai Amoona. Topics will include an update on legislation in Jefferson City, …

STL Public Radio: Missouri legislators hope to repeal abortion laws after similar rules struck down in Texas

By Durrie Bouscaren

Three Democrats in the Missouri legislature plan to file bills repealing two of the state’s laws restricting abortion facilities, following a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision that threw out similar measures in Texas.

“It is the right thing to do. And we have, frankly, women on our side, the medical community on our side, and now the highest law in the land on our side,” Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, said on a conference call Wednesday.

She was joined by Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. …

The Missouri Times: A Kangaroo at the Capitol: Liberals reject Sanctity of Life investigation

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Before the start of Tuesday’s press conference regarding the findings of a yearlong investigation by the Republican members of the Senate Sanctity of Life Committee, everyone could not help but notice the elephant in the room.

But in this case, the elephant was a kangaroo.

An unidentified person affiliated with Progress Missouri, which describes itself as a “progressive advocacy organization,” dressed up as a kangaroo in judge’s robes as a form of protest regarding the investigation into Planned Parenthood by the Senate Interim …

STL Post-Dispatch: Senate Republicans: Planned Parenthood probe led to ‘more questions than it has answers’

By Celeste Bott St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Senate Republicans said Tuesday that the findings of a special committee formed to investigate how Planned Parenthood disposes of fetal tissue point to the “callous treatment of women,” but offered little proof, admitting the investigation turned up more questions than answers.

After more than a year of hearings and reviews, Sen. Kurt Schaefer, a Columbia Republican who chaired the special panel, acknowledged that the effort fell short of getting all the information.

“The Legislature’s ability to conduct investigations is …

Jewish Light: Covenant Place marks major milestone

Posted: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 4:00 pm

By Eric Berger, Staff writer | 0 comments

The shiny floors and untouched rooms of the Covenant Place stood in sharp contrast to the cloudy skies and humid air outside at a ribbon-cutting ceremony Tuesday for the new senior residence facility in Creve Coeur.

About 100 lawmakers, Jewish leaders and Covenant Place residents, volunteers and staff attended the event despite the threat of rain.

The 101-room facility replaces the oldest of the Covenant Place buildings located next door on the I.E. …

KMOV: Mo. state lawmakers: New gun control laws not on the table in aftermath of Orlando shooting

By Dan Greenwald, Online News Producer
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(Credit: KMOV)
(Credit: KMOV)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (KMOV.com) –

The mass shooting in Orlando has sparked another debate about gun control, but Missouri state lawmakers say gun control measures will never pass the state legislature.

The legislature is dominated by rural lawmakers who are adamantly opposed to gun control.

Representative Kevin Engler, R-Farmington, says increased access to guns saves lives.

“I would tell you increased access to guns lowers crime rates, they don’t attack hard targets, they attack soft targets,” said Engler.

State Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve …

The Pitch: KC’s CFPB hearing on payday lending today a reminder just who keeps defending an indefensible industry

Barbara Shelly

The federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau couldn’t have picked a better spot than Kansas City for a hearing on payday lending. Friends and foes have been dug in for years, and Thursday’s forum, at the Music Hall, brought everybody out of the trenches.

Critics began massing at Barney Allis Plaza around 9 a.m. They brought signs and slogans to make a point: that short-term loans at exorbitant interest rates are ruining families and draining money from communities.

Notable among the consumer activists and faith leaders heading …

Consumers Council of Missouri: Senator Jill Schupp : Consumer Hero

CCM would like to recognize the tenacious work of Senator Jill Schupp who has been a strong advocate for electric, gas and water consumers. She effectively opposed unfair surcharges for gas and water customers, and helped stop automatic formula electric rate hikes. Please thank Senator Schupp for standing strong for consumers: [email protected]

STL Post-Dispatch: Miss a doctor visit? You might have to pay a fine under a Missouri proposal

By Kurt Erickson • St. Louis Post-Dispatch May 30, 2016 (23)

JEFFERSON CITY • Just like hotels and car rental companies that charge people who miss their reservations, Missouri doctors could start requiring certain patients to pay a fee if they miss their appointments.

Under a proposal heading to Gov. Jay Nixon’s desk, Medicaid providers could impose a missed appointment fee on MO HealthNet patients who miss or fail to cancel 24 hours in advance.

It also allows providers to refuse to schedule …

KMOV News 4 Investigates: Why Missouri doesn’t have a ban on texting and driving

Posted: May 03, 2016 8:34 PM CDT
Updated: May 03, 2016 10:50 PM CDT
By Lauren Trager, Investigative reporter
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By Ashlee Carlstrom
Connect

(Credit: KMOV)
(Credit: KMOV)

(KMOV.com) – Some officers say distracted driving is getting worse than drunk driving or speeding.

Officials say distracted driving accidents could leave 10,000 people killed or injured in Missouri in 2016.

Missouri has one of the weakest texting and driving laws in the nation.

Each and every day, Patty Kaelin still misses her sister Sergeant Peggy Vassallo.

In August 2015, the Bellefontaine Neighbors Police Department’s Sgt. Peggy Vassallo was …

STL Post-Dispatch Op-Ed: The push for paid family and medical leave in Missouri

By Allison Simmonds and Katherine Landfried

Inherent in American culture is a prevalent competitive nature — the desire as citizens, and as a country, to be the best at everything. So when the United States sits alongside Oman and Papua New Guinea as one of the few countries in the world that do not offer paid maternity leave, it should raise concern. Countries such as the United Kingdom offer 40 weeks of paid maternity leave; and even Iran, widely criticized for its poor stance on human …

West Plains Daily Quill: Proposed park plans to move ahead

Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 12:00 am | Updated: 8:18 am, Thu May 19, 2016.
by Abby Hess

With the failure of House Bill 2187 and corresponding Senate Bill 1011 to make their way through the Senate floor by the end of Missouri’s legislative session last week, plans for Oregon County land purchased by Missouri Department of Natural Resources to be turned into a state park may move forward.

Both bills sought to restrict the ability of DNR and other state agencies to purchase acreage in …

St. Louis Public Radio: For some, Missouri lawmakers’ ethics push still has a long way to go

By Jason Rosenbaum • 11 hours ago

If there’s one constant about the last week of the Missouri General Assembly’s session, it’s that nobody in the Capitol has to search very hard to find delicious pie.

For several decades, senators have served up rhubarb pies, French silk pies, and even gooseberry pies to hungry legislators and staff. The uncontroversial and widely celebrated “Pie Day” event provides a big boost to proprietors like the Rolling Pin in Glasgow, and a bit of levity within the General …

The Kansas City Star: Winners and losers of Missouri’s 2016 legislative session

By Jason Hancock

[email protected]
JEFFERSON CITY

More than 2,000 bills were introduced during the 2016 session of the Missouri General Assembly. Only 138 found their way to the governor’s desk.

A lot of priorities never got off the ground. Others sailed across the finish line. Most died somewhere in between, culled by a legislative process often mired in gridlock.

Complicating the process was a looming election. The entire House is up for grabs this fall, along with half the Senate. A handful of lawmakers are running for statewide office, and …

West Plains Daily Quill: Predatory lending bill stalled in committee

Your car breaks down. The mechanic says repairs will cost $309, but you just paid your mortgage and electric bill. A close family member has been in the hospital, so you have missed work, and funds are tighter than normal. What do you do?

You might borrow from friends and family, if they have the resources. Or, for any number of reasons, you might stop by your neighborhood “payday loan” company. They’re all too happy to help, and since you get paid biweekly and know you’ll …

The Kansas City Star: ‘Stand your ground’ law wins Missouri Senate approval

By Jason Hancock

[email protected]

JEFFERSON CITY

A wide-ranging gun bill that includes a controversial “stand your ground” law won Missouri Senate approval Friday afternoon, the last true hurdle before going to the governor.

The bill needs one more vote in the House, which has approved similar legislation numerous times. The legislature adjourns at 6 p.m.

A “stand your ground” law allows a person to use deadly force in self-defense without the duty to retreat when faced with a perceived threat. The bill also contains a provision making it legal for …

STL Post-Dispatch: Missouri lawmakers push lingering priorities over finish line as others fizzle

By Jack Suntrup St. Louis Post-Dispatch May 13, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY • After one last filibuster in the Missouri Senate Thursday night, lawmakers returned to the Capitol Friday to push through lingering priorities before the Legislature adjourned for the year at 6 p.m.

What became the focal point of the final day was a sweeping plan to loosen the state’s gun laws.

The proposal would allow adults without a permit to carry a concealed weapon anyplace where concealed carry is not forbidden. The proposal also would expand the …

STL Post-Dispatch: GOP sends gun bills to Nixon

By Kurt Erickson St. Louis Post-Dispatch May 13, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri lawmakers made their final push to loosen state gun laws Friday, sending Gov. Jay Nixon an 11th hour plan to make it legal for people to carry concealed weapons without a permit.

The 72-page proposal also includes an expansion of Missouri’s self-defense laws by allowing a person to use deadly force in public places if they believe a reasonable threat exists.

“If you’re going to attack somebody you’ve got to pay the consequences,” said Republican …

Columbia Missourian: Expansion of concealed weapons to campuses, public transportation fails in committee

by Shane Sanderson

JEFFERSON CITY — It’s still illegal to carry a concealed weapon on college campuses and public transportation in Missouri.

A legislative conference committee revamped a bill on Tuesday, dumping provisions to allow concealed carry on state campuses, buses and trains. The bipartisan group of legislators kept the portion that would let any legal gun owner carry a concealed weapon without a permit.

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, shook her head disapprovingly throughout the conference session. She said in a later interview that she opposed the …

KMOV: News 4 Investigates: Why Missouri doesn’t have a ban on texting and driving

Posted: May 04, 2016 9:35 AM CDT
Updated: May 04, 2016 9:35 AM CDT
KMOV Staff

Missouri — Some officers say distracted driving is getting worse than drunk driving or speeding.

Officials say distracted driving accidents could leave 10,000 people killed or injured in Missouri in 2016.

Missouri has one of the weakest texting and driving laws in the nation.

Each and every day, Patty Kaelin still misses her sister Sergeant Peggy Vassallo.

In August 2015, the Bellefontaine Neighbors Police Department’s Sgt. Peggy Vassallo was involved in a minor accident at …

The Missouri Times: Photo voter ID bill overcomes filibuster

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Senate Republicans saw their opportunity to pass a photo voter ID law Monday night, and they took it. The bill passed 24-8 along party lines with no discussion Tuesday.

With both Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D-St. Louis, and Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, absent Monday night, two of the staunchest opponents of HB 1631 did not have a chance to speak against the measure before it was perfected. The Senate’s vote effectively ended a filibuster on the legislation that had occurred incrementally for …

STL Post-Dispatch: Agreement reached in Missouri Senate over contentious voter ID proposal

By Jack Suntrup St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri Senate Democrats and Republicans have reached an agreement over a proposal that would require voters to show ID at the ballot box.

Under a version of the legislation adopted Monday, if voters don’t present a photo ID, they would sign a statement under penalty of perjury attesting that they are who they say they are. The voter would then have to present some form of ID, such as a university-issued ID or a utility bill.

“The bill is …

STL Post-Dispatch: Senate endorses tougher rules on towing companies

By Kurt Erickson St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Towing companies in Missouri’s urban areas could face tougher rules under a plan moving through the Legislature.

On a 29-3 vote, the Senate approved a proposal requiring tow companies to stay open or be available to customers for 10 hours a day, five days a week, except on federal holidays.

Sen. Paul Wieland, R-Imperial, who chaired a 2015 committee that investigated predatory towing practices, said the law attempts to rein in unscrupulous companies.

The Senate Task Force on Predatory Towing …

The Missouri Times: Fetal tissue regulation bills heard in the Senate

By Tim Curtis

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The Senate Seniors, Families and Children Committee heard testimony on Rep. Diane Franklin and Rep. Andrew Koenig’s legislation that prohibits the sale of fetal tissue from abortions in Missouri and regulates procedures for proper disposal of the fetal tissue.

The bills, HBs 2069 and 2371 were combined in the House, and passed overwhelmingly with 120 votes. The bill seems likely to receive similar support in the Senate and Sen. Jill Schupp, D-St. Louis County, was the only member of the …

Associated Press: Senate passes grant to attract large conventions

Posted 11:30 pm, April 25, 2016, by Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) _ The state Senate has approved a proposal designed to lure large conventions to Missouri.

Senators voted 27-4 Monday to create a grant that would cover up to half the operating expenses for conventions drawing at least half their attendees from out-of-state.

Republican Sen. David Sater said without incentives, Missouri is competing against other states on an uneven playing field.

Republican Sen. Ed Emery opposed the bill, saying any positive impact would be nearly impossible to …

St. Louis Public Radio: Tobacco companies bankrolling rival efforts to hike Missouri’s tobacco tax

By Jo Mannies • Apr 21, 2016
For all the talk about increasing Missouri’s tobacco tax to provide more money for education and transportation, the state’s two dueling tobacco-tax proposals appear caught in a longstanding dispute that has nothing to do with their objectives.

Tobacco companies are the chief donors to both initiative-petition campaigns that seek to increase the state’s 17-cent-a-pack tobacco tax, now the nation’s lowest. One would raise the tax by 23 cents a pack to pay for transportation improvements, while the other would …

STL Post-Dispatch: ‘Illegal reentry’ of deportees would be new crime under measure advanced by Missouri Senate

By Jack Suntrup St. Louis Post-Dispatch
JEFFERSON CITY • The Missouri Senate voted Thursday to create the crime of “illegal reentry” in the state.

The legislation states that anyone who is deported from the United States for committing a crime, returns and commits an assault or any felony would also be guilty of illegal reentry in Missouri.

The offense would be a class C felony. Custody of the person convicted would be transferred to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement “as soon as practical.”

The Senate voted 26-6 to …

The Joplin Globe: Senate advances bill on sentencing options for first-degree murder by juveniles

BY CRYSTAL THOMAS [email protected]

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — The Senate gave initial approval Monday to a bill that would give sentencing options for first-degree murder for juveniles, putting the Missouri courts in line with previous Supreme Court decisions.

If the bill becomes law, other than the current sentence of life without parole, juvenile murderers older than 16 could be assessed a minimum 50 years and be eligible for a parole hearing, while juvenile murderers younger than 16 could be assessed a minimum of 35 years and then …

Missourinet: Missouri Senate gives initial approval to state law against illegal reentry into U.S.

April 19, 2016 By Alisa Nelson

Preliminary approval has been given by the state Senate to a proposal that would charge those entering Missouri without legal immigration status with a Class “C” felony if they are accused of any other felony or assault. That would carry a 1 to 7 year prison sentence. Senator Mike Cunningham (R-Rogersville) says the federal government isn’t doing its job in immigration enforcement.
Sen. Mike Cunningham (R-Rogersville)

Sen. Mike Cunningham (R-Rogersville)

“The feds aren’t dealing with the situation. That’s quite evident,” said Cunningham. “They …

STL Post-Dispatch: Juvenile murderers could get parole hearings

By Kurt Erickson St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • More than 80 juvenile murderers could get parole hearings as part of an overhaul of state crime laws that won preliminary approval in the Senate Monday.

Under the rewrite moving through the Senate, if a juvenile sentenced for first degree murder was younger than 16 at the time of the offense, he could be eligible for parole after 35 years. If the murderer was 16 or older, he or she would be eligible for parole after serving 50 …

STL Today: Vacation in Missouri? Schupp to visit colleagues’ turf

By Virginia Young St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Virginia Young

JEFFERSON CITY • Sen. Jill Schupp is planning her summer vacation, but she’s not heading to a faraway, exotic locale.

The Creve Coeur Democrat is plotting a 30-day, off-and-on itinerary that includes visits to nearly every Senate district in the state. She said the trips will help her better understand the state’s diversity — and her 33 colleagues.

“I am really excited,” Schupp said. “Missouri is an amazing place, geographically, business-wise.”

Schupp, who served in the House before …

Boonville Daily News: Missouri NAMI Director speaks in Boonville

Local Boonville residents and law enforcement heard from the Missouri National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) Executive Director Cynthia Keele spoke Tuesday during a meeting at the Nelson Memorial Methodist Church. She talked about legislation that could affect mental health within the state.

By Edward Lang, Managing Editor

Posted Apr 15, 2016 at 12:01 AM
Updated Apr 15, 2016 at 8:32 AM

Boonville

Local Boonville residents and law enforcement heard from the Missouri National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) Executive Director Cynthia Keele spoke Tuesday during …

STL Post-Dispatch Opinion: Gun violence is a community health issue

by Jill Schupp and Deb Lavender

You’ve been there. When the subject of guns is brought up in “mixed” company, the conversation either becomes volatile or stops altogether. When it comes to reducing gun violence, people seem to stand clearly on one side of the issue or the other: minimize access to firearms, require background checks, close the loopholes, and get rid of assault weapons or enforce current laws, allow people to protect themselves and their property, keep arms away from the mentally ill, and open …

STL Post-Dispatch: Senate moves forward with contempt proceedings against Planned Parenthood

by Kurt Erickson
JEFFERSON CITY • After more than seven hours of debate spread over two days, the Missouri Senate endorsed a plan requiring a top Planned Parenthood official to comply with a subpoena seeking information on how the organization disposes of fetal remains.

On a 24-8 vote, senators agreed to move forward with contempt proceedings against Mary Kogut, the CEO of Planned Parenthood of St. Louis and Southwest Missouri and Dr. James Miller of Pathology Services Inc. The vote was along party lines, with Republicans in …

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Missouri Senate OKs $27 billion budget

By Kurt Erickson
Friday, April 8th, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY • The Missouri Senate signed off on the major pieces of a $27.2 billion state budget Thursday, setting in motion a final push by Republican lawmakers to get the spending blueprint to Gov. Jay Nixon’s desk.

The plan, which would go into effect July 1, restores funding cuts made in the House that had been targeted at the University of Missouri system after last year’s protests on the Columbia campus.

And, it attempts to address rising costs of providing health …

OzarksFirst: Senate Budget Version Strips Medicaid Funding from Planned Parenthood

Friday, April 8th, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — The state Senate has joined the House in proposing a budget that would defund organizations that provide abortions. Planned Parenthood is the only one in Missouri.

Senator Kurt Schaefer (R-Columbia) told Senator Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) that the state’s not paying Planned Parenthood anymore. He said Missourians can go other places that provide the same services, except for abortions.

“The federal government gets to dictate where the money goes. If we take it out, we get to dictate where …

St. Louis Post Dispatch: Next up in Capitol: Valet parking for lawmakers

By Kurt Erickson
Thursday, April 7th, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY • When it comes to perks enjoyed by members of the Missouri Legislature, valet parking at the Capitol could be next.

In action Thursday, the Senate voted in favor of spending $50,000 in the fiscal year beginning July 1 to address parking problems in a garage located in the basement of the statehouse.

As envisioned by Sen. Mike Parson, R-Bolivar, the money would pay for someone to park and move cars in the cramped lot.

Parson, a former sheriff who is …

Associated Press: Missouri Senate passes $27 billion spending plan

By Adam Aton
Thursday, April 7th, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) – More money would go to public schools, universities and scholarships under a budget plan the Missouri Senate passed Thursday that would also cut state funding for Planned Parenthood.

The $27 billion spending plan, which now must be hashed out with a version the House passed last month, also boosts funding for prison guards, public defenders and health care providers. But despite the extra money for education and health care, senators from both parties cited fundamental issues …

St. Louis Public Radio: “This Week” with Sen. Will Kraus

By Joey Parker, April 1st, 2016

Senate Bill 594, which would require voter ID in Missouri, is awaiting debate in the Senate.

The sponsor of SB594 is Republican Senator Will Kraus of Lee’s Summit.

As our guest for “This Week,” Senator Kraus makes his case as to why he wants his bill to become the law.

Here is a transcript of our conversation:

Senator Will Kraus: When somebody cheats the system, and tries to cheat the system like they did in Kinloch, Missouri, like where 27 people voted from an …

Columbia Tribune: Senate approves commission to study University of Missouri administration

By Rudi Keller
Tuesday, April 5th, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY — The University of Missouri would be required to implement recommendations of an eight-member review commission or face possible budget cuts next year, the Missouri Senate decided Monday.

The Senate voted 28-2 to approve a proposal from Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, to look at the university’s rules, administration, campus structure and auxiliary enterprises as well as degree programs, research and diversity efforts.

The commission is Schaefer’s response, in part, to the turmoil on the Columbia campus this past fall that …

Associated Press: Senate Votes to Expand Secretary of State’s Powers

By Associated Press
April 1st, 2016

The Missouri Senate has voted to give the secretary of state the authority to prosecute election crimes.

Senators voted 25-4 Thursday to allow the secretary of state’s office to issue probable cause statements and take cases to court. The office can currently investigate complaints, but any prosecution is left to local officials or the attorney general’s office.

Bill sponsor Will Kraus said local prosecutors would still have the first opportunity to try a case, but those officials often focus more on crimes …

OzarksFirst: Missouri Youth Suicide Prevention Proposal Passed by Senate

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo- The state Senate has unanimously passed a bill that would require the Missouri Department of Education to create training guidelines and districts to adopt a youth suicide awareness and prevention policy.

Senator Jill Schupp says the measure could save lives.

“When we can catch a student, young person or anyone contemplating suicide, in that moment and stop them, lend them a hand, we generally almost all of the time prevent them from going to the next step and attempting suicide again,” said Schupp.

She says …

KTTS: Youth Suicide Prevention Bill Passed

By Sydney Smith
April 1st, 2016

Creve Coeur Democrat Jill Schupp’s proposal that would require public school districts to adopt a youth suicide awareness and prevention policy has won unanimous support in the Senate.

The measure would also require the Missouri Department of Education to create youth suicide awareness and prevention training guidelines.

Training would be offered, but not mandatory for educators.

Schupp says the new measure could save lives.

The second leading cause of death among children ages 10 to 24 is suicide.

The proposal will now be sent to the …

Human Rights Campaign: HRC Partners with Promo and ACLU to Oppose Discriminatory Missouri Legislation

By Joe Saunders
April 1st, 2016

HRC was on the ground in Missouri this week working closely with our partners at PROMO, Missouri’s statewide LGBT advocacy organization, and the Missouri ACLU. SJR 39, discriminatory legislation that could enshrine religious bigotry into the Missouri constitution, has been a top priority for HRC since its filing at the beginning of this year’s legislative session. For months now HRC has been working closely with our partners on the ground to bring attention to SJR 39. Our work to bring a …

Associated Press: Senate votes to expand Secretary of State’s powers

By Adam Aton
Associated Press
Thursday, March 31st, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) – Missouri’s secretary of state would have the power to prosecute election crimes under a measure the Senate approved Thursday.

Senators voted 25-4 to allow the secretary of state’s office to issue probable cause statements and take cases to court. The office’s election division currently investigates complaints, but any prosecution is left to local officials or the attorney general’s office.

Sen. Will Kraus, a Republican from Lee’s Summit who sponsored the bill, said local prosecutors would still …

Associated Press: Missouri senator seeks testimony from Planned Parenthood

By Adam Aton, Associated Press

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) – A Missouri state senator began moving forward Wednesday with an effort to hold a Planned Parenthood official in contempt for refusing to provide documents on how the organization handles fetal remains.

Sen. Kurt Schaefer filed resolutions summoning Mary Kogut, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri, and Dr. James Miller, owner of the suburban St. Louis Pathology Services Inc. that reviews tissue from Planned Parenthood, to the …

Kansas City Star: Missouri lawmakers hopeful for final two months of 2016 Session

BY JASON HANCOCK

[email protected]

 JEFFERSON CITY

The fever that gripped the Missouri Senate for two weeks appears to have broken.

But the hard feelings that nearly short circuited the legislative session remain.

The Senate has been consumed by a “religious freedom” amendment to the state’s constitution since March 7, when Democrats kicked off what became a 39-hour filibuster of the bill. Republicans responded with a rarely-used procedural maneuver that cut off debate and forced a vote, which in turn sparked a week of Democratic stall tactics in retaliation.

The impasse …

Joplin Globe: Some lobbyist groups operating in Jefferson City shield donors

by Crystal Thomas

March 5th, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Jeremy Cady’s face is a familiar one around the Missouri capitol.

A lobbyist for the Missouri Alliance for Freedom, he is frequently seen testifying either in favor of or against legislation and meeting with lawmakers and their staffs.

As president of the group, Ryan Johnson, too, is familiar, and not just in Jefferson City. He travels the state on behalf of the Alliance, most recently speaking to Southwest Missouri Republicans gathered Saturday night in Joplin for the annual Jasper-Newton …

STL Post-Dispatch: Stalled by battle over gay marriage measure, Missouri Senate leaders say it will get back on track

 

By Kurt Erickson St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Republican and Democratic leaders say there is still plenty of time left in the legislative session to pull the Missouri Senate out of its partisan quagmire.

With Democrats still steamed at Republicans for using a parliamentary maneuver last week to ram through a controversial same-sex marriage proposal, members of the minority party again kept the Senate from conducting any business Tuesday.

Rank-and-file Democrats blocked senators from introducing guests and continued complaining about GOP “strong arm” tactics.

“We’re going to continue talking …

Associated Press: Local advocates, business owners watching religious objection bill closely

Brett Reyes | 11 March, 2016, 23:35

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Democrats in the Missouri Senate say there is no end in sight for their filibuster over a proposal to add greater religious protections to the state Constitution for some business owners and individuals opposed to gay marriage. Similar to so-called “First Amendment Defense Act” legislation introduced in other states, this outrageous and extreme resolution would lead to a ballot measure that proposes to allow individuals, organizations, and businesses to use religion as a valid …

STL Post-Dispatch: Missouri Senate gummed up a day after marathon filibuster ends

By Jack Suntrup St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Traffic in the Missouri Senate stalled again Thursday, a day after a rare parliamentary maneuver was used by Republicans to shut down a 37-hour Democratic filibuster.

Democrats drew national attention this week after opposing a measure that would grant greater legal protections to clergy, wedding vendors and religious organizations that oppose same-sex marriage. Their filibuster ended Wednesday morning after the majority Republicans flexed their muscle to force a first-round vote on the proposal.

Wounds inflicted during the epic debate …

Riverfront Times: The Missouri Democratic Senate Filibuster Was Totally Epic

Posted By Sarah Fenske on Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 6:40 AM

SHUTTERSTOCK/Fotos593
A “religious freedom” bill that would codify the right to discriminate against same-sex marriages has triggered a record-setting filibuster at the Missouri Senate.

Even this morning, they were still talking.

The Democratic caucus of the Missouri Senate began filibustering a controversial “religious freedom” proposal on Monday at 4 p.m. And at 6 a.m. this morning, they were still holding the floor — 38 hours, and counting.

It took a Republican procedural move called a …

STL Post-Dispatch: Republicans end filibuster in Missouri Senate

Updated at 7:45 a.m.

JEFFERSON CITY • After more than 36 hours of non-stop debate, Republicans who control the Missouri Senate shut down a Democrat-led filibuster of a controversial same-sex marriage proposal early Wednesday.

Using a parliamentary maneuver, Republicans voted to end the blockade, which had put a national focus on a GOP-sponsored measure to shield clergy, wedding vendors and religious organizations from penalties if they oppose same-sex marriage.

The Senate then voted 23-9 to give the proposal preliminary approval.

The Senate’s minority party launched its stalling attempt at about 4 p.m. Monday and went non-stop until Republican leaders called for a break at about 5 a.m. Wednesday.

Word began spreading about the filibuster Monday night. By Tuesday afternoon, national outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, Buzzfeed and the Los Angeles Times were covering the marathon.

Presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders tweeted their support. State Sen. Wendy Davis of Texas — who gained notoriety after her own filibuster in 2013 — also praised the Democrats’ efforts.

But the national attention — and yes, some backlash — hadn’t swayed Republicans as of 9 p.m.

Sen. Bob Onder, the sponsor, said it’s necessary so photographers, bakers and others aren’t “commandeered” into participating in same-sex marriages or receptions. The Lake Saint Louis Republican also wants to make sure churches don’t lose any tax benefits they have now if they oppose gay marriage.

Onder’s proposal would place the question on the ballot in the form of a constitutional amendment. If passed by voters, Democrats say it would enshrine discrimination against gays into the state constitution.

Throughout the Tuesday, regional differences among the body were apparent. All eight Senate Democrats represent urban areas in and around St. Louis and Kansas City. Most of the 24 Senate Republicans represent more rural areas.

The topics of talk while Democrats were holding the floor ranged from attire to food to nearly every other Senate bill that had passed committee so far. At about 7 p.m., Democratic Sen. Shalonn “Kiki” Curls of Kansas City and Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal of University City talked about relentless gun violence in the St. Louis and Kansas City areas.

Democrats generally support tighter regulations on firearms, while Republicans have generally opposed them.

“It goes back to the notion that we don’t share the same social reality,” Curls said.

“And that’s key,” Chappelle-Nadal said, “because people need to understand that we have different cultural experiences in our communities.”

The divide — and a perceived lack of understanding — cut both ways.

On Onder’s proposal, Sen. Ed Emery of Lamar said his views, shaped over a lifetime, are why he supports the measure on same-sex weddings.

“My conscience is directed by a certain standard of beliefs that have not changed since I accepted those as a young adult,” Emery said.

He said he just doesn’t want a baker to be forced to violate his or her conscience.

“I’m not asking the maker of wedding cakes to do anything but make wedding cakes for those patrons who want to purchase wedding cakes,” said Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur.

“And violate their conscience?” Emery asked.

“Well, you know what, violating conscience would be forcing them to marry someone of the same sex,” Schupp said. “That would be violating their conscience.”

While Schupp said she doesn’t think that priests should be compelled to perform same-sex marriages, she said business owners should be required to provide services to everyone, regardless of sexual orientation.

“So that’s the rub; that’s where you and I see things differently,” she told Emery.

As of 9 p.m., there was no breakthrough on the Senate floor.

“To say that we haven’t made progress would be false,” said Sen. Scott Sifton, D-Affton. “To say that we’re close to getting this to where it needs to be to come to a vote would also be false.”

Associated Press: Missouri Democrats Filibuster Religious Objections Measure

By david a. lieb and summer ballentine, associated press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Mar 8, 2016, 7:11 PM ET

A filibuster by Democrats in the Missouri Senate pushed past the 24-hour mark Tuesday as they tried to block a Republican proposal to add greater religious protections to the Missouri Constitution for some business owners and individuals opposed to gay marriage

The Missouri proposal, which could go before voters later this year, highlights the tension between civil rights and religious liberties that still exist in many parts of the …

Associated Press: Missouri Democrats stall religious objections measure

By SUMMER BALLENTINE Associated Press

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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.

Missouri Senate Democrats waged a filibuster that stretched into Tuesday morning to block a vote on a proposed amendment to the state constitution that would grant greater protections to individuals, religious organizations and some businesses opposed to gay marriage.

Democrats spoke for hours in opposition to the measure, which would ban government penalties against individuals and businesses that refuse on religious grounds to provide goods or services of “expressional or artistic creation” for marriage ceremonies or celebrations of same-sex couples. That could include coverage for florists or bakers, who in other states have faced legal challenges for declining to provide services for same-sex weddings.

Clergy and religious leaders also wouldn’t face government punishment for refusing to marry same-sex couples, and places of worship that close their doors for those weddings would be protected.

Sponsor Sen. Bob Onder, a Lake St. Louis Republican said the aim is to prevent the government “from persecuting folks who live out their religious beliefs.” He added that the measure, which would require voter approval, is intentionally crafted to be narrower than other recent measures that have faced a backlash — for example, a proposal in Indiana that was criticized by businesses.

Republican lawmakers in various states, including Georgia and West Virginia, have pushed such measures following the U.S. Supreme Court decision last June that legalized gay marriage nationwide. A constitutional amendment also has been proposed in Oklahoma, and Florida lawmakers last week sent Republican Gov. Rick Scott a bill to specify that churches can’t be forced to marry same-sex couples.

But Democrats argued the measure unfairly targets same-sex couples and could mean the state loses out on prospective employees turned off by the policy.

Creve Coeur Democrat Sen. Jill Schupp said some individuals, businesses and organizations “would be given permission to discriminate” if the amendment is approved.

Missouri Republican leaders from the GOP-controlled House and Senate have voiced support for proposals they say would protect religious liberties. The Democratic filibuster in the Senate is one of few tactics the minority party can use to fight bills with strong Republican backing.

The Supreme Court’s ruling effectively invalidated a Missouri constitutional amendment limiting marriage to one man and one woman. That amendment had been approved by 70 percent of Missouri voters in 2004 — making Missouri the first state to add a gay-marriage ban to its constitution after the Massachusetts Supreme Court permitted gay marriage in that state.

Missouri also is one of more than 20 states with religious objection laws already in place. Missouri law bans state and local government agencies from substantially limiting a person’s right to follow their religious beliefs unless there is a compelling reason to do so.

If the measure is approved by lawmakers, it likely would appear on the ballot for the August primary or the November general election.

Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/news/state/missouri/article64694217.html#storylink=cpy

The Joplin Globe: Some lobbyist groups operating in Jefferson City shield donors

Some lawmakers want donors’ names disclosed, but say they need protection

By Crystal Thomas [email protected]

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Jeremy Cady’s face is a familiar one around the Missouri capitol.

A lobbyist for the Missouri Alliance for Freedom, he is frequently seen testifying either in favor of or against legislation and meeting with lawmakers and their staffs.

As president of the group, Ryan Johnson, too, is familiar, and not just in Jefferson City. He travels the state on behalf of the Alliance, most recently speaking to Southwest Missouri Republicans …

Schupp issues statement on Senate’s failure to increase transparency in elections

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, today offered an amendment that would have increased reporting requirements for political action committees (PACs) and other groups categorized as 501(c)(4) organizations. It did not receive enough votes to pass.

“This was an enormous missed opportunity that would’ve drastically changed the election process by adding more transparency and accountability. Instead, the body voted to continue to allow special interests to buy our elections under the cover of darkness,” Schupp said. “I’m deeply disappointed that so many colleagues voted ‘No,’ and recognize that Missourians who are gearing up for another round of elections may feel that their voices are being drowned out by the dark money in politics.”

The amendment would have required 501(c)4 organizations which are involved with electioneering activities to file electronic spending reports with the Missouri Ethics Commission. All of the disclosures would be public record. The amendment language is identical to Schupp’s SB 808.

To pass, an amendment requires a simple majority of votes. The amendment failed by a vote of 15 to 15. Two senators were absent.

###

The Missouri Times: Schupp issues statement on Senate’s failure to increase transparency in elections

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, today offered an amendment that would have increased reporting requirements for political action committees (PACs) and other groups categorized as 501(c)(4) organizations. It did not receive enough votes to pass.

“This was an enormous missed opportunity that would’ve drastically changed the election process by adding more transparency and accountability. Instead, the body voted to continue to allow special interests to buy our elections under the cover of darkness,” Schupp said. “I’m deeply disappointed that so many colleagues voted ‘No,’ and recognize that Missourians who are gearing up for another round of elections may feel that their voices are being drowned out by the dark money in politics.”

The amendment would have required 501(c)4 organizations which are involved with electioneering activities to file electronic spending reports with the Missouri Ethics Commission. All of the disclosures would be public record. The amendment language is identical to Schupp’s SB 808.

To pass, an amendment requires a simple majority of votes. The amendment failed by a vote of 15 to 15. Two senators were absent.

STL Public Radio: Missouri Senate sends more ethics changes to the House

By Marshall Griffin • 11 hours ago

The Missouri Senate has expanded one of the proposed ethics bills passed by the House in January.

Originally, House Bill 2203 required that any money held by former lawmakers be held in bank accounts that could make that money readily available. It was part of the House Republican leadership’s approach to reforming Missouri’s ethics system.

The Senate added more requirements Thursday, including one that requires former lawmakers to dissolve any campaign committees before becoming a lobbyist. In addition, some political nonprofits …

STL Public Radio: Beer battle resolved, for now; craft brewers said to be worried

By Marshall Griffin

Updated with initial Senate approval – A wide-ranging bill designed to increase sales of cold beer in Missouri is moving forward again.

The Missouri Senate gave first-round approval Wednesday to Senate Bill 919. It would allow beer companies to lease portable refrigerators to convenience stores and grocers as a means of increasing shelf space, and it would allow those same stores to sell beer in reusable containers, commonly known as growlers.

Opponents, including Dan Brown, R-Rolla, argue that the bill would unfairly benefit big companies such as Anheuser-Busch InBev over locally owned craft brewers.

“I don’t think I’m naïve enough to realize that with the basic policy change that we’re doing that InBev is going to let anybody put whatever they want in their cooler,” he said. “It might start out that way, but I’m just telling you that isn’t going to last very long.”

Sen. Dave Schatz, R-Pacific, disagreed with Brown’s argument and said the portable fridges would not be brand specific.

“If I am the convenience store owner, I dictate the shelf space I’m going to allow to it,” Schatz said. “Now if InBev comes in here and they buy up all the convenience stores … then yes, they are going to control the shelf space. But the convenience store owner (and) the grocery store owner — they are the ones that dictate who has what shelf space (and) where it is, not InBev or anybody else, or even craft brewers.”

“Unless they take (back) the cooler,” Brown shot back.

Brown is seeking the Republican nomination for state treasurer. The bill’s sponsor, fellow Republican Eric Schmitt of Glendale, is also running for state treasurer.

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, had been blocking the bill, but decided to allow it to be voted on.

“We have craft brewers … and 4,000 jobs at stake here throughout our state. My position has been clear (and) I think I’ve said everything that I need to say in opposition to this bill,” Schupp said. “I hope others will stand up and take up the cause to support the little guy, the entrepreneur, the small businessmen in the state.”

She gave no reason for her decision to yield the floor.

The bill narrowly passed on a voice vote. It needs one more Senate vote before moving to the House.

Original story (Feb. 29) – Legislation designed to expand sales of cold beer has been put on ice in the Missouri Senate.

The wide-ranging bill would allow brewers to lease portable refrigerators to retail stores and allow those same stores to sell reusable growlers. Currently, growlers sales in Missouri are only allowed directly from breweries and at bars that meet certain criteria.

Debate began on Senate Bill 919 last week, but was suspended so the Senate could spend more time on other issues. The bill was taken up again Monday, but a group of opponents began dominating floor debate. That, in turn, led the sponsor, Eric Schmitt, R-Glendale, to ask the bill to be laid aside again.

He maintains that the bill would be good for all brewers in Missouri.
Credit (via Flickr/Mooganic)

“Sixteen states allow brewers to lease refrigerators, including Wisconsin (home of Miller Brewing) and Colorado (home of Coors Brewing),” Schmitt said when debate began last week. “The reason for doing this is simple: beer is the number two selling category in convenience stores, and 92 percent of convenience store shoppers buy cold beer, (and) beer is the number 4 category in grocery stores. However, research shows that one in five consumers at these retail outlets will leave without having purchased beer if the brand isn’t cold.”

Democrat Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur contends, though, that the bill is designed to benefit Anheuser-Busch InBev at the expense of locally owned brewers.

“Earthbound, Piney River and Urban Chestnut have all contacted me and said, ‘This bill is not good for us, the little guy,'” Schupp said. “To give A-B InBev essentially what will amount to additional shelf space to crowd out those other brewers, I think, is significant.”

Opposition also came from Republicans, including Dan Brown of Rolla.

“I have a lot of micro breweries in my area. … I don’t know that I’ve ever had any more contact, both by telephone and by email, than I have on this one issue,” he said. “They feel pretty threatened and as a group tend to not support this idea.”

Brown also happens to be challenging Schmitt for the Republican nomination for Missouri treasurer.

Schmitt insists that the bill will benefit small local breweries as well as the big national brands.

“All I can do is point to the facts in the places that are doing it (including Wisconsin), and the small brewers have done exceedingly well in those places, and in fact, there is more available cold space for their products as well,” he said.

There is no word yet on when or if Schmitt will ask for debate to resume on the wide-ranging bill.

Follow Marshall Griffin on Twitter: @MarshallGReport

Fox 2 St. Louis: Intern scandals force examination of lawmakers’ conduct

Posted 10:27 pm, February 29, 2016, by Betsey Bruce

JEFFERSON CITY, MO (KTVI) – Embarrassing scandals in Missouri’s capital involving a handful of individuals has citizens asking what goes on in Jefferson City after hours?

Accusations of questionable behavior with college interns prompted two legislators to resign last spring and summer.  Another resignation in February following an extramarital affair and charges of sexual harassment against a former lobbyist last week kept the issue in the headlines.

Reforming Missouri state ethics laws is a top priority for both House …

Northwest Missourian: Senate proposes new bills for driving safety

ake McKnight News-Editor @jbmcknight93 | 0 comments

Four new bills governing seat belt use, texting while driving and helmet requirements for motorcyclists prompted debate in a Missouri Senate committee.

Texting while driving is only forbidden for commercial drivers and people younger than 22. Two of the bills would ban texting while driving for everyone. One of the bills is sponsored by Senator David Pearce, the other by Senator Jill Schupp.

A legislation from Sen. Jason Holsman would allow motorcycle riders who are at least 21 and have health insurance to ride without a helmet. They must also have been licensed for two years or have completed a safety class.

Another proposal by Schupp would require everyone in a car to wear a seat belt, no matter the age. Law states adults in the backseat are exempt from seat belt requirements. It would also allow police to stop drivers solely for suspicion of not wearing a seat belt.

Missouri’s rate of seatbelt use was about 79 percent and trending downward in 2014, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, while the national usage rate was remaining stable around 87 percent.

The Missouri Highway Patrol also argues that one half of those killed in traffic fatalities would not have died had they worn seat belts. In the past year, 603 people in Missouri died in traffic accidents.

Reactions to the proposal have been fairly positive.

“It’s okay, but I feel like it’s a time regulation. I mean how will the cops even check if everyone is wearing their seatbelt? But if it benefits everyone’s safety then it’s a good thing.” senior Olivia Morris said.

Parents seem to be onboard with the idea since kids under the age of 22 are required to wear a seatbelt at all times.

“My moral feeling, everyone should be legally required to restrain their kids or anyone in the car. It’s for safety. But if you’re 40 years old and wanna fly through a windshield that’s their choice.” Professor Chris Strelluf said.

Schupp had a similar piece of legislation. She also offered a bill that would change Missouri’s law on seat belts to a primary seatbelt law.

Primary seatbelt laws allow law enforcement to make traffic stops and write citations specifically for people who fail to wear a seatbelt. A secondary law means that a citation for those not wearing their seatbelt can only accompany another traffic offense like speeding.

Truckers, insurance agents, and even law enforcement also testified in favor of the bill.

However, the bills also raised concerns from some members of the committee on how to balance safety with government intrusion.

Sen. Dave Schatz, R-Washington had significant problems with both pieces of legislation, concerned with how such measures could be enforced, statistics on seatbelt usage and the imposition of new laws on drivers. He did not want law to prompt police officers to pull over more Missourians and instead stressed the need for education and awareness.

Each of the bills still needs a vote to move out of committee and onto the Senate floor. It is not clear if or when those votes will occur.

Insurance business News Resources E & S Specialty Find coverage Forum E-mag Subscribe Contact us Missouri legislature debates medical costs in civil lawsuits

by Lyle Adriano | Feb 23, 2016
On Feb. 17, the Missouri Senate gave initial approval to a bill that would require actual medical costs to be considered as evidence in civil lawsuits, instead of the value of medical treatments for the plaintiffs.

The bill was heavily debated over by both Republicans and Democrats since the day before.

Republicans in support of the bill assert that only the out-of-pocket expenses of insurance companies and victims can be reviewed in a trial, and the cost of care should not be considered.

“If you were the defendant, you would know exactly what the medical cost was,” argued Republican Sen. Ed Emery. “It’s a hard number.”

Democrats say that the bill could lead to lesser compensation to victims in personal injury lawsuits.

“At the end of the day, it’s going to end up, in my view, unfairly reducing the amount of compensation that’s paid to the plaintiff, the victim,” said Democratic Sen. Jill Schupp.

During the debate that started the day before, disputes between both parties over what the bill would do if enacted pushed Democrats to block a vote, causing a standoff that lasted all night.

It was only by the next day, Feb. 17, at 6am that the stalemate ended, when senators adopted several changes that Democrats proposed to the legislation. One of the changes was adding language to ensure that costs would count what both insurance companies and victims pay in medical fees.

The bill needs another vote of approval before it passes on to the House for review.

Advocates from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention to Visit Missouri Lawmakers to Urge Their Support for School Suicide Prevention Bills

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., Feb. 23, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — On Wednesday, February 24, 2016, volunteers from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the largest suicide prevention organization in the United States, will host a media briefing at 9 a.m. in Hearing Room 3 of the Missouri State Capitol House to discuss the importance of passing suicide prevention legislation.

The advocates will then meet with lawmakers to encourage them to pass three pieces of legislation which would increase the number of elementary and secondary educators trained in suicide prevention (SB 646/HB 1546, HB 1656) and would require public institutions of higher education to inform college students about available mental health and suicide prevention resources (SB 627). Advocates are also encouraging passage of two Senate Continuing Resolutions that would designate the month of September as Suicide Prevention Month (SCR 50) and May as Mental Health Awareness Month (SCR 49).

“While Missouri’s suicide rate is a serious public health problem for the state, we also know that suicide can be preventable with more education and public awareness,” said Melody Seiger, chapter chair of the AFSP Mid-Missouri Chapter who lost her mother to suicide. “It is imperative that we pass this legislation immediately – our children, local community and school educators need our help. We have a responsibility to make suicide prevention a priority – the future of our state depends on it.”

Sponsored by Sen. Jill Schupp and Rep. Jeanie Lauer, SB 646/HB 1546, Youth Suicide Awareness and Prevention in Schools would, beginning in the 2017-2018 school year, allow, any licensed educator to annually complete up to two hours of training or professional development in youth suicide awareness and prevention as part of the professional development hours required for State Board of Education certification. Rep. Randy Dunn sponsored HB 1656, the Jason Flatt Act that if passed, would require all public school teachers to complete annual training in suicide awareness and prevention, beginning in school year 2017-2018.

Since both of these programs are targeted at schools in the lower grades, SB 627, the Higher Education Suicide Prevention Policies targets public colleges and universities. If passed, SB 627 would require each public institution of higher education to develop and implement a policy to advise students and staff on available suicide prevention programs and resources, both on and off campus, including crisis intervention and hotline services, local mental health and counseling services, multimedia apps, and student educational, outreach, and postvention plans. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Jamilah Nasheed would also require public institutions of higher education to provide all incoming students with information on depression and suicide prevention resources.

Advocates from across the state of Missouri are joining the conversation on February 24th to urge the passage of this important legislation, including: AFSP Eastern Missouri chapter, AFSP Greater Mid-Missouri chapter, and the AFSP Greater Kansas chapter. AFSP thanks all the sponsors and co-sponsors of the above mentioned bills under consideration, and especially thanks Sen. Jill Schupp for her support and leadership on this issue in 2015 and 2016.

Suicide in Missouri
Over twice as many people in Missouri die by suicide than by homicide. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people ages 10-24 in Missouri and for adults ages 25-34. On average, one person dies by suicide every 8.5 hours in Missouri.

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention is dedicated to saving lives and bringing hope to those affected by suicide. AFSP creates a culture that’s smart about mental health through education and community programs, develops suicide prevention through research and advocacy, and provides support for those affected by suicide. Led by CEO Robert Gebbia and headquartered in New York, and with a public policy office in Washington, D.C., AFSP has local chapters in all 50 states with programs and events nationwide. Learn more about AFSP in its latest Annual Report, and join the conversation on suicide prevention by following AFSP on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160223/336363

SOURCE American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

St. Louis Public Radio Politically Speaking: Sen. Schupp talks about paying for family leave and MU’s discord

By Jason Rosenbaum & Jo Mannies • Feb 14, 2016

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, Sen. Jill Schupp returns to the show for the third time to talk about the Missouri General Assembly’s fast start.

The Creve Coeur Democrat was elected to the 24th District Senate, which encompasses more than 20 municipalities in St. Louis County. Schupp is part of an eight-person Democratic caucus that’s seen its influence wane as the GOP made gains in the General Assembly’s upper chamber.

Still, that bloc of …

AP: Missouri Senate backs limits to medical costs in court cases

Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 2:00 pm

JEFFERSON CITY (AP) — The Missouri Senate on Wednesday gave initial approval to a bill changing how medical expenses are handled in court cases after Democrats ended an all-night filibuster that dragged out debate that began the day before.

The measure would require actual costs — not the value of medical treatment for plaintiffs — to be considered as evidence in civil lawsuits.

Republican supporters say they aim to ensure that only the out-of-pocket expenses of insurance companies and victims can be reviewed in a trial — and not what’s considered the cost of care, which could be higher.

“If you were the defendant, you would know exactly what the medical cost was,” said Republican Sen. Ed Emery, the bill sponsor from Lamar. “It’s a hard number.”

Democrats said the bill could mean victims in personal-injury lawsuits receive less money.

“At the end of the day, it’s going to end up, in my view, unfairly reducing the amount of compensation that’s paid to the plaintiff, the victim,” said Democratic Sen. Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur.

Those concerns — and disputes between the two parties over what the legislation would do if enacted — spurred an hourslong stall tactic by Democrats. The stalemate ended around 6 a.m. Wednesday, after senators adopted several changes that Democrats proposed to the legislation.

The measure needs another vote of approval before it can head to the House for review.

Posted in Business, Wire on Thursday, February 18, 2016 2:00 pm.

AP: Missouri Senate backs limits to medical costs in court cases

By SUMMER BALLENTINE Associated Press

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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.

The Missouri Senate on Wednesday gave initial approval to a bill changing how medical expenses are handled in court cases after Democrats ended an all-night filibuster that dragged out debate that began the day before.

The measure would require actual costs — not the value of medical treatment for plaintiffs — to be considered as evidence in civil lawsuits.

Republican supporters say they aim to ensure that only the out-of-pocket expenses of insurance companies and victims can be reviewed in a trial — and not what’s considered the cost of care, which could be higher.

“If you were the defendant, you would know exactly what the medical cost was,” said Republican Sen. Ed Emery, the bill sponsor from Lamar. “It’s a hard number.”

Democrats said the bill could mean victims in personal-injury lawsuits receive less money.

“At the end of the day, it’s going to end up, in my view, unfairly reducing the amount of compensation that’s paid to the plaintiff, the victim,” Democratic Sen. Jill Schupp, of Creve Coeur, said Tuesday while the measure was being debated.

Those concerns — and disputes between the two parties over what the legislation would do if enacted — spurred an hourslong stall tactic by Democrats to block a vote.

The stalemate ended around 6 a.m. Wednesday, after senators adopted several changes that Democrats proposed to the legislation. Among the changes was adding language to ensure that costs would include what both insurance companies and victims pay in medical expenses.

The measure needs another vote of approval before it can head to the House for review.

Medical expenses bill is SB 847.

Online:

Missouri Senate: http://senate.mo.gov

Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/news/article60909802.html#storylink=cpy

Missourinet: Missouri Senate considers if ex-office holders should cool off before lobbying careers begin

February 18, 2016 by Alisa Nelson

The state senate is considering if legislators and statewide elected officials should be allowed to become lobbyists immediately after leaving office or if they should be required to wait for a designated period.

Senator Jill Schupp (D- Creve Coeur) supports a cooling off period.
emery and schupp

Senators Ed Emery and Jill Schupp

“I do think that putting distance between yourself and the people with whom you just finished serving is important,” said Schupp.

Senator Rob Schaaf (R- St. Joseph) thinks there should be a cooling off period.

“What we’re trying to do here is change the system so that good people don’t do things, even on a subconscious level, that advantage special interests against the public policy,” said Schaaf.

Senator Ed Emery (R- Lamar) said as long as legislators and elected officials wait until after their term expires, then it’s their choice.

“The process is certainly faulty,” said Emery. “It has created crevices where weaknesses can be exploited, but the process isn’t corrupt. The process is what the process is.”

Emery said becoming a lobbyist is an individual liberty and an economic freedom.

“The idea of those of us in government regulating the choices of the people and in turn violating individual opportunities, I’m just not ready to go there.”

The bill also includes former office holders that require senate confirmation.

St. Louis Public Radio: On the Trail: Legislative angst places University of Missouri in a tough spot

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, said GOP lawmakers may be “backing off from some of that tough talk,” adding she wouldn’t be surprised if Schaefer played a role in restoring any potential higher education cuts. “Because at the end of the day, what we know happens is these cuts hurt students. And I don’t think that either [Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard] or Sen. Schaefer wants to be accountable for what may be an issue of hurting the ability of students to access to a quality higher education that they need.”

Joplin Globe: Opponents of death penalty make case in Jefferson City

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Jimmy Castetter said he will never forget every moment of March 17, 2015.

That was the day that Cecil Clayton — the man found guilty of murdering his younger brother, Chris Castetter — was executed.

Now, almost a year later, Jimmy Castetter can tell you what he wore that day, how many checkpoints there were at the state prison in Bonne Terre, even the food served in its waiting room.

Judy Glaze is the same way. The mother of Jimmy and Chris Castetter remembers sitting in her Seligman living room with two of her grandchildren that day, repeatedly checking the clock. On that day, Clayton was still hoping for a stay from the U.S. Supreme Court, his advocates arguing that he was incompetent because he was missing part of his brain following a 1972 sawmill accident.

The courts have upheld prohibitions against the execution of those who are intellectually disabled.

Clayton, friends and family said, had been a peaceful man, a pastor, a man who visited nursing home patients, until that accident, which led to the removal of 20 percent of his frontal lobe. After that, he grew increasingly paranoid, broke up with his wife, was prone to violent outbursts, and was unable to work.

But the Supreme Court denied the stay.

Glaze said she knew Clayton’s ex-wife and children and she didn’t feel comfortable witnessing Clayton’s execution.

Jimmy Castetter also is sympathetic to Clayton’s family, calling them “innocent ones in the situation.”

But both Castetter and Glaze believe Clayton deserved to die.

They and others in the family had been waiting for that day for nearly 19 years.

On Nov. 27, 1996, Clayton shot Chris Castetter, a 29-year-old Barry County sheriff’s deputy, at point-blank range while Castetter was in his squad car waiting for back up. Castetter had been dispatched to a farm south of Cassville in response to a report of a domestic disturbance made from Clayton’s girlfriend’s house. Castetter lived for a day more and then died in the early hours after Thanksgiving.

Clayton was eventually convicted and sentenced to death, but his advocates continued to argue that even though he had pulled the trigger, he didn’t deserve to die.

“There is a little stress and you wonder everyday if I would live long enough to see if your son’s killer would be put to death,” said Glaze, now 72.

On March 17, 2015, Clayton was executed by lethal injection. The curtains opened and Jimmy Castetter said he saw Clayton on a gurney, covered below his shoulders with a white sheet. He watched as Clayton’s chest lifted, up and down, slowed, then stopped.

Clayton was dead. Castetter said he felt relief.

Death penalty debate

According to the Missouri Department of Corrections, Missouri’s Capital Murder Law has been in effect since 1977, a year after the U.S. Supreme Court allowed states to reestablish the death penalty. More than 80 people have been executed since then, the last execution taking place last fall.

But now, a coalition of lawmakers, both Republicans and Democrats, are pushing for Missouri to repeal its death penalty. A Senate bill, which recently passed out of committee on a 4-3 vote, found support on both sides on the floor, though not along party lines. It was the first floor debate on the merits of the death penalty in years.

Republican Sen. Paul Wieland, R-Imperial, sponsor of the bill, teamed up with Republican Sens. Rob Schaaf and Jamilah Nasheed, both of the St. Louis area, and Democratic Sens. Jill Schupp and Gina Walsh, also of the St. Louis area, to make their case for repealing the death penalty.

Each is coming at their opposition from different perspectives.

Wieland said he has four objections to the death penalty. As a Catholic, he believes the death penalty is inconsistent with the church’s teaching that all life is sacred. Second, he said that as a fiscal conservative he thinks the implementation of the death penalty is an ineffective use of tax dollars. He also doesn’t believe the death penalty deters crime, especially given the long periods that transpire between sentencing and execution. And finally, he argued, lethal injection is inherently unfair.

“Some of us are going to suffer with cancer, with other debilitating diseases, some of us are going to fall asleep and not wake up,” Wieland said. “To me, that seems like the easiest way to go out of this world. To me, the people that commit these most heinous crimes, that is what they are giving them, the most easy way to get out of this world.”

Schupp said too many people have been sentenced to death and later exonerated for her to feel comfortable with its use. Since 1973, 156 people on death row across the nation have been exonerated, according to the Death Penalty Information Center. Three of those were Missouri inmates.

“Yes, we want our revenge, we want to punish,” Schupp said. “But what happens when one, just one person who is innocent of a crime — because some information is incorrect and because juries are given some evidence and not all of the evidence — what happens when an innocent person is sent to death row and then killed? How much is that innocent life worth?”

Nasheed believes use of the death penalty still reflects racial bias, noting a 2015 study by the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill found that homicides involving white victims were seven times more likely to result in executions than those involving black victims. And cases involving white female victims were 14 times more likely to result in execution than those involving black male victims. The disparity was such that it “may erode judicial and public confidence in the state’s ability to fairly administer the ultimate punishment,” the authors concluded.

Schaaf said the arbitrariness of the justice system, especially when it comes to the death penalty, helped change his mind about the death penalty.

Death penalty supporters

But the coalition is bumping against others in the Senate who have equally strong beliefs in favor of the death penalty.

Republican Sens. Mike Parson, David Sater, Ed Emery and Kurt Schaefer were vocal opponents of the bill.

Sater, R-Cassville, represents Judy Glaze’s district.

Sater last week said he is a believer in the death penalty because it provides closure for victims’ families. Sater also helped the Castetter family erect a highway sign in honor of Chris during his days in the Missouri House of Representatives.

“If you have done something so horrible, you do not deserve to be alive,” Sater said.

Parson, R-Bolivar, said only those who have committed premeditated acts of violence should get the death penalty, and he said it should be reserved for only the most brutal of murders. He is running for lieutenant governor.

As a former sheriff, Parson said he also believes the use of the death penalty will bring justice to victims.

Parson also said that sometimes those on death row are portrayed as victims of the state.

“What we are really talking about is killers,” he added.

Schaefer, R-Columbia, said that as a former prosecutor he knows how many hoops a court must jump through before a criminal can be executed. He is running for Missouri attorney general.

Both he and Emery, R-Lamar, said the punishment must be equal to the crime.

“If we say anything less than a life is equal to a life, we have devalued life,” Emery argued.

Though the repeal of the death penalty has gathered unprecedented support in the Senate, bill sponsor Wieland said he didn’t put the bill up to a floor vote and that just having the conversation was important.

In the House, a bill sponsored by six Republicans and four Democrats has been introduced to repeal the death penalty, as well. One of the sponsors is Bill Lant, R-Pineville.

However, another Southwest Missouri lawmaker, state Rep. Mike Kelley, R-Lamar, wants to expedite the use of the death penalty. His bill would have the Missouri Supreme Court review death penalty cases within 30 days and require an execution date to be set within 60 days.

‘Hard to lose someone’

According to a 2014 Pew Research Center report, a decreasing majority of Americans favor the death penalty. In 2014, 56 percent of Americans supported the death penalty, which is 6 percent less than in 2011. In 1996, 78 percent of Americans favored the death penalty.

For Glaze, the question of the death penalty is personal in a way most people will never understand.

Now, a year after Clayton’s execution and 20 years after her son’s death, she said she still can’t help but cry.

“They have to walk in your shoes until they can understand,” Glaze said. “It’s hard. It’s hard to lose someone.”

No death penalty

Nineteen states do not have the death penalty, and many, including Missouri neighbors Illinois and Nebraska, have abolished it in recent years, citing costs, the difficulty of getting drugs used in lethal injection, the exoneration of people on death row and other concerns.

KBIA: Federal leave act mandates time, not pay; new Missouri legislation would add wages

Two Democratic legislators from St. Louis County, Rep. Tracy McCreery and Sen. Jill Schupp, are introducing The Missouri Earned Family and Medical Leave Program.

President Bill Clinton’s Family and Medical Leave Act has been around for 23 years. And these two legislators think it’s time for a change.

“You know, there’s a myth out there. … Well, why do we need to do this in Missouri? Don’t we have this federal program that’s been around since 1993? Well, sure, there is a federal program. But, the reason it doesn’t work for today’s families is because it’s unpaid,” McCreery said.

Around 40 percent of workers in the United States don’t qualify for benefits of the family leave act and many of those who do can’t afford to take unpaid leave, even for a family emergency. This bill intends to alleviate some of those pressures.

Employees would be required to contribute annually to a fund administered by the Department of Labor. Supporters say this is a small cost — a person making $50,000 a year would pay $125 annually — for a big reward.

St. Louis Public Radio: Federal leave act mandates time, not pay; new Missouri legislation would add wages

Two Democratic legislators from St. Louis County, Rep. Tracy McCreery and Sen. Jill Schupp, are introducing The Missouri Earned Family and Medical Leave Program.

President Bill Clinton’s Family and Medical Leave Act has been around for 23 years. And these two legislators think it’s time for a change.

“You know, there’s a myth out there. … Well, why do we need to do this in Missouri? Don’t we have this federal program that’s been around since 1993? Well, sure, there is a federal program. But, the reason it doesn’t work for today’s families is because it’s unpaid,” McCreery said.

Around 40 percent of workers in the United States don’t qualify for benefits of the family leave act and many of those who do can’t afford to take unpaid leave, even for a family emergency. This bill intends to alleviate some of those pressures.

Employees would be required to contribute annually to a fund administered by the Department of Labor. Supporters say this is a small cost — a person making $50,000 a year would pay $125 annually — for a big reward.

Then, given such things as the birth of a child or the death of a parent, employees could take up to six weeks of paid leave.

NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri supports the legislators’ bill. Alison Dreith, the organization’s executive director, says the bill will not only expand options for new parents, but for anyone experiencing a family emergency.

“We having an aging population, especially here in Missouri,” said Dreith. “I have myself in the last 12 months lost my dad and had to go through a lot with taking care of a father and a grandparent at the same time.”

Rep. McCreery says the people want this. A recent survey by the National Partnership for Women and Families showed that 79 percent of voters believed it to be important that the law guarantee access to paid family and medical leave.

The proposal was announced today in Jefferson City and is not yet scheduled for hearings.

The Missouri Times: Democrats to offer paid leave initiative

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Rep. Tracy McCreery, D-St. Louis, and Sen. Jill Schupp, D-St. Louis, have teamed up to create a bill to guarantee paid family leave for new parents and working as caretakers for elderly family members.

The Missouri Earned Family and Medical Leave Act would create a fund within the Department of Labor that employers and employees would pay into to that employers could then use to provide paid leave to their employees – up to six weeks each year. Workers could use that time to take care of a new baby or an ailing parent.

McCreery noted at a press conference Thursday that the current federal program does not fit in today’s society where both adults in a two-parent home are working.

“There is a federal program, but the reason it doesn’t work for today’s families is because it is unpaid,” she said. “The vast majority of workers cannot afford to take a day off of work, let alone a couple hours off of work to care for someone.”
Schupp

Schupp

Schupp attempted to allay fears about the bill, noting it would not put a burden on the state (only that the state would administer the program) and that it could not be used by employees to take six week long vacation.

“Within the bill, it’s very specific about what you have to provide to actually prove that you need this medical leave even within a given time frame,” Schupp said. “There will always be people who want to take advantage of a system. However, we believe that we have put into this bill those parameters around which someone has to demonstrate their eligibility.

One of the bill’s early allies is NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri, and their executive director Alison Dreith noted that it was a bit of a departure from their usual advocacy of abortion rights. However, she did state that NARAL supported paid leave because it allowed women more reproductive freedom in giving women greater control over their pregnancies and hopefully by strengthening families.

“Today, we’re here on a different note, which is … changing the conversation about what reproductive freedom really means for women and when women and families choose to go through with a pregnancy that they have everything available to them to make sure those families are happy and healthy.”

McCreery added that in addition to health families, paid leave could help tighten the wage gap that exists between men and women since women usually take more time off than men for maternity leave, decreasing chances at future job opportunity or salary hikes.

“It is an equality issue,” McCreery said. “We talk about equal pay a lot, and it’s very frustrating because we have a hard time getting employers to pay men and women equally. So, one of the things we’re trying to do is be realistic about how we can impact women and their lives and their families’ lives. And this is a great example of something we can actually have an impact on.”

Associated Press: Missouri senators consider government role in road safety

Bills governing seat belt use, texting while driving and helmet requirements for motorcyclists prompted debate in a Missouri Senate committee Wednesday over whether the government should play a larger role in road safety.

Two bills — one sponsored by Republican Sen. David Pearce, the other by Democratic Sen. Jill Schupp — would ban texting while driving, which currently is forbidden for only commercial drivers and people younger than 22.

Another proposal by Schupp would require everyone in a car to wear a seat belt, including adults in the backseat, who are currently exempt from seat belt requirements. It would also allow police to stop drivers solely for suspicion of not wearing a seat belt.

Washington Missourian: General Assembly Seeks Ethics Reform in 2016

Ethics reform was a major topic of discussion at the State Capitol Thursday.

House Rep. Jay Barnes (R-Jefferson City) and Sens. Jill Schupp (D-St. Louis) and Rob Schaaf (R-St. Joseph) addressed the need for ethics reform for the General Assembly. The panel was speaking to reporters at the 26th annual Missouri Press Association and The Associated Press Day at the Capitol.

The Examiner: Lawmakers argue ‘meaningful’ ethics reform

By By Jeff Fox
[email protected]

Posted Feb. 5, 2016 at 5:15 AM

Legislative leaders say the Missouri General Assembly is acting quickly on tightening ethics rules, but other legislators argue the steps are not nearly enough.

“I think most of the bills we see are tinkering around the edges of ethics …” Sen. Jill Schupp, D-St. Louis, told publishers and editors from around the state Thursday during a panel discussion at the state Capitol.

The speaker of the House, however, told publishers and editors that action on “substantive, meaningful ethics reform” is underway.

“The public’s confidence in what we do is important to the legitimacy of what we do,” said the speaker, Rep. Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff.

It’s still early in the 2015 session, but at least two measures are moving ahead. One is requiring that legislators be out of office for at least a year before taking work as a lobbyist.

“That’s consistent with a majority of states. It is consistent with Congress,” said Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City and chair of the House Government Oversight and Accountability Committee.

Another would ban lobbyist gifts to legislators.

“I don’t think anyone’s vote has ever been bought with a meal,” Barnes said, but he added that the meals and other gifts over time break down a wall that should stand between lobbyists and legislators.

Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, described what he repeatedly called “the institutional corruption that’s built in” at the General Assembly and put the gift issue in starker terms.

“The whole idea of it is you give me something, I give you something,” he said. “It’s understood.”

The larger issue, some Democrats have argued, is the state’s lack of limits on campaign contributions. Voters imposed limits several years ago – $325 from any person for a primary, another $325 for the general election – but the Legislature repealed those limits, and contributions of six and seven figures have occurred in some state races.

“If you don’t think there’s some undue influence in that – I think there is,” Shupp said.

Legislative leaders have said they won’t consider campaign finance limits this year, and Sen. Ron Richard, R-Joplin and president pro tem of a Senate, underlined that point Thursday.

“You all want it,” he told publishers and editors. “We don’t. So it’s not going to happen.”

Gov. Jay Nixon also favors campaign finance limits, as well as banning the practice of legislators hiring each other as political consultants, which on Thursday he called “nothing more than laundering campaign funds.”

The Joplin Globe: Senate president pro tem on campaign contribution limits: ‘It’s just not going to happen’

By Crystal Thomas [email protected] 10 hrs ago

0

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — The shuffling of political money and the transparency surrounding it were hot topics among legislators as journalists swarmed the Capitol for The Associated Press/Missouri Press Association Day.

During a question-and-answer session at the Governor’s Mansion, Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard, R-Joplin, put in his final word about whether campaign contribution limits — Missouri doesn’t have any — would be addressed this session.

“I know you all have questions about campaign limits,” Richard said unprompted. “I know you all want it, we don’t. It’s just not going to happen.”

Earlier in the day, Sens. Jill Schupp and Rob Schaaf, as well as Rep. Jay Barnes, spoke about ethics and campaign finance reform in a panel discussion.

Barnes, R-Jefferson City, said the House is unlikely to pass campaign finance limits because if limits existed, the already large amount of campaign contributions would go underground, not disappear altogether.

“I think enacting limits, all it does is send (money) through other routes that make it less transparent,” Barnes said.

Both Schupp, a Creve Coeur Democrat, and Schaaf, a St. Joseph Republican, agreed more transparency was needed when it came to contributions made by nonprofit organizations with a 501(c)(4) tax-exempt status.

Those organizations are “social welfare” groups that can only spend 49 percent of their money on political activities, such as lobbying and campaign contributions. Unlike super political action committees, they are not required by law to report who their donors are and do not have to act independently of a candidate. However, a 501(c)(4) group does need to report large expenditures and campaign contributions in its yearly 990 tax forms. The National Rifle Association, Planned Parenthood and the Sierra Club are examples of 501(c)(4) groups.

Schaaf said with the 2010 Supreme Court decision in the Citizens United case to consider money as a form of free speech that can’t be limited, campaign contributions have gotten out of control, with 501(c)(4)s leading the way.

He said that “501(c)(4)s are just a big loophole that everybody walks through.”

Schupp called contributions by 501(c)(4)s the “dark money” of politics. Schupp filed a bill about 501(c)(4)s having to electronically disclose expenditures used for electioneering activities, such as advertisements and fliers. Schupp said in a world of instant misinformation through social media, the more transparency of official sources means a more informed citizenry.

“That’s why if you have access to the source and where things came from and where monies have moved, I just think you are in a better position to know where the truth lies,” Schupp said.

Regarding campaign contribution limits, “I think it gives people confidence that the electorate is not bought and sold,” Schupp said.

Barnes, who is chairman of the committee through which several ethics bills have passed, was once a proponent of 501(c)(4) transparency, going so far as to write an opinion piece in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in favor of it. However, he said he has since changed his mind.

“I thought about how angry these 501(c)(4) ads make me as a sitting legislator,” Barnes said. “They make me want vengeance against the people I think are buying them because they are absolutely cowardly.”

Barnes said that made him realize 501(c)(4) donors would, if their identities were made public, would have to fear backlash from elected officials that they might have spent against.

Schaaf said the need for transparency should transcend a possible legislator’s anger. He said too many legislators benefit from 501(c)(4) groups and that the only way to stop the spending would be through a ballot initiative.

St. Joe Channel: Suicide Prevention Bill Advances in Jeff City

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.

A bill aimed at training educators to spot the signs of suicide has advanced in the Missouri Senate.

Senate Bill 646 passed unanimously out of the Senate Education Committee Wednesday.

The bill would allow elementary and secondary licensed educators to annually receive up to two hours of professional development credit for suicide education and prevention training.

It would also charge the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) with formulating guidelines for training and development surrounding youth suicide prevention, and coordination with school districts to update model policies and practices aimed at countering this issue facing Missouri’s youth.

“This legislation would save lives. It equips our educators with the tools and resources they need to help identify at risk children and prevent another family from the unimaginable grief of losing a child to suicide,” said Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Couer. “I’m grateful to the committee for fast-tracking this legislation that prioritizes the lives of young Missourians.”

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among young people ages 15 to 24.

It is the third highest cause of death among 10 to 14-year-olds, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Additionally, Missouri’s suicide rate has been higher than the national average for more than a decade, according to the Missouri Institute of Mental Health.

Missouri Western State University President Dr. Robert Vartabedian recently testified before the committee on Senate Bill 646.

Vartabedian created a chart called “A Model of Suicidal Communication” for Missouri Western staff and students after a student committed suicide on campus in 2013.

KMZU: Senate Bill 816 looks to repeal death penalty in Missouri

Shelby Flynn | February 3, 2016
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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The state of Missouri is seeking to repeal the death penalty, thanks to Senate Bill 816. The Missouri Senate General Laws and Pensions Committee was first notified about the measure January 19, 2016, and voted “do pass” the next week.

jail6

Senator Paul Wieland of Imperial spoke out, explaining the financial toll the death penalty currently has.

Senator Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur also expressed concern, referencing to testimonies made during a hearing that took place January 26, 2016.

Senate Bill 816 is on the Missouri Senate calendar and could possibly be discussed at any time.

STL Post-Dispatch: Women seeking out-of-state abortions could receive information packet under measure

Riddle’s measure also would require providers to offer to send the materials to a woman who does not seek information about an out-of-state abortion provider in person. That woman would not have to pay for the shipping.

This provision worried Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur. Shipping the information could become problematic if the woman is in an abusive relationship and doesn’t want her partner to know.

Associated Press: Mo. Senate panel urges contempt for Planned Parenthood

By Associated Press

Posted Jan. 5, 2016 at 8:00 AM

Jefferson City

A Republican-led Missouri legislative panel says the Senate should launch contempt proceedings against the leader of a St. Louis-region Planned Parenthood.

The report comes after Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri didn’t comply with a subpoena sent to President and CEO Mary Kogut.

The Senate Interim Committee on the Sanctity of Life was formed after anti-abortion activists released videos they said showed Planned Parenthood personnel negotiating the sale of fetal organs.

Some committee members wanted records of incidents that required an ambulance and written protocols for performing abortions.

The St. Louis Planned Parenthood is the only Missouri clinic that provides abortions. Officials didn’t immediately comment Monday.

Creve Coeur Sen. Jill Schupp and another Democrat didn’t sign the report. Schupp says it was politically motivated.

The Missouri Times: Sen. Schupp Finds Interim Committee on the Sanctity of Life “Deeply Troubling,” Rejects Report

JEFFERSON CITY — State Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, today expressed frustration and disappointment with the Interim Committee on The Sanctity of Life, refusing to sign the committee’s “unilaterally-written, politically-motived” report.

“I agreed to serve on this committee because I am concerned with medical ethics irrespective of politics,” Senator Schupp explained. “The Planned Parenthood videos, while heavily edited, were troubling to me. Unfortunately, this committee has devoted little attention to its stated mission and has instead morphed into a politically motivated witch hunt.”

Despite the issuance of subpoenas and multiple large-scale sunshine requests, the Sanctity of Life committee has failed to expose any information suggesting fetal tissue or organs were being sold by Planned Parenthood. A separate two-month investigation by the Attorney General similarly found no evidence of illegal activity.

“This committee, despite multiple hearings, subpoenas, and sunshine requests, has produced nothing to suggest Planned Parenthood has broken any laws or engaged in unethical practices,” Schupp asserted. “Sadly, these facts, while inconvenient, haven’t stopped the chairman from using his committee for political gain. He’s not letting the truth get in the way of a good story.”

A vast majority of the committee’s time has been used to attack the University of Missouri System, with which Chairman Schaefer has a well-publicized political grievance concerning his bid to become Missouri’s next Attorney General. Schaefer’s only opponent in that race was recently granted a year of unpaid leave by the University to run his campaign.

Among the many subpoenas and information requests issued to University officials, a letter from Schaefer dated Oct. 30, 2015 attempts to repress a graduate student’s research project on the effects of Missouri’s new anti-abortion laws.

“This committee has sunk to the level of suppressing academic freedom,” Schupp stated. “Unable to discover any wrongdoings by Planned Parenthood, the committee has mutated into a crusade against women’s healthcare, the University system and academic freedom. The Chairman is literally combing through academics’ research, looking for ‘illegal’ academic inquiries. The transition from medical ethics to criminalizing educational research is deeply troubling.”

Senator Schupp also took issue with the manner in which the committee report was constructed.

“The committee never met to discuss any aspect of the report,” the Senator noted. “Then one day an email appeared that literally said ‘Here’s the report, respond with approval.’ There was no semblance of proper process; no discussion, no edits – just unilateral dictates.”

Senator Schupp joined Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal, the only other Democrat on the committee, in refusing to sign the report.

For more information on Sen. Schupp’s legislation, visit her official Senate website at www.senate.mo.gov/schupp.

The Missouri Times: Senator Jill Schupp files bill to expand safety requirements for in-home child care facilities

JEFFERSON CITY —Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, today pre-filed legislation that would modify in-home unlicensed child care facility regulations in order to increase transparency and expand critical safety requirements.

“Every day, parents place their precious children in child care and trust they’re receiving quality care from capable and loving individuals in a safe environment,” Sen. Schupp said. “There are simple steps we can take to help assure parents they have the information they need to select a qualified facility for their child.”

Sen. Schupp’s legislation would enact four changes that aim to increase transparency and quality of care at unlicensed in-home child care facilities. The act would require children under kindergarten age who are related to a caregiver to be counted in the total number of children being cared for. It would also require every child care facility to disclose its licensure status to the parents or guardians of the children under its care. Additionally, the bill increases existing fines for making materially false statements about the licensure status or capacity of the facility, and the bill also empowers the Department of Health and Senior Services to immediately close any illegally operating unlicensed child care facility based on harm or imminent harm to the children involved.

“The safety of our children needs to be our top priority,” Sen. Schupp said. “Under the status quo, too many children have lost their lives in unlicensed in-home care. There are ways to help ensure a much safer environment, and it is time for the legislature to make children’s lives its priority.”

For more information on Sen. Schupp’s legislation, visit her official Senate website.

Associated Press: Missouri Senate passes limits on municipal fines

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Minor traffic tickets and ordinance fines would be capped at $200 under a bill that has passed the Missouri Senate.

Senators voted 25-6 on Thursday to send the bill to the House. Four Republicans and two Democrats voted against it.

Bill sponsor Sen. Eric Schmitt said some towns in St. Louis County use minor citations to extract as much revenue as possible from their residents. The St. Louis County Republican said that tactic has trapped some people in a cycle of poverty.

Sen. Jill Schupp is a St. Louis-area Democrat who voted against the bill. She said state government shouldn’t tell cities what is and isn’t appropriate to keep their communities safe and clean. She said voters in those municipalities already have the power to change unfair ordinances.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Kansas City Star: Missouri Senate bill no longer targets Kansas City earnings tax

Kansas City’s earnings tax is safe, at least for the moment.

St. Louis isn’t so lucky.

A bill that would have eliminated the earnings tax in in both cities by 2017 was amended Thursday morning to exclude Kansas City completely. It now focuses exclusively on St. Louis’ earnings tax, phasing it out over 10 years.

The bill was approved by the Missouri Senate Ways and Means Committee on a 4 to 2 party-line vote. It now goes to the full Senate.

Kansas City leaders weren’t ready to celebrate or declare victory. The session is only in its first month, and the Senate could always reverse course. Meanwhile, there are a handful of bills that still target Kansas City’s earnings tax in the Missouri House.

But more importantly, Kansas City continues to vehemently oppose the legislature eliminating St. Louis’ earnings tax. Mayor Sly James released a statement Thursday noting that removing Kansas City from the bill is a step in the right direction, “but this is a local control issue that needs to be put to rest.”

“The local earnings tax was, is and remains a local-control issue,” James said. “Cities — all cities — should have right to decide how to govern themselves. That is why we oppose this ill-advised legislation.”

Both cities rely on the 1 percent earnings tax for a substantial portion of their budgets. The tax generated nearly 45 percent of Kansas City’s general fund last year, paying for police, fire, trash removal and other city services.

In St. Louis, the earnings tax makes up one-third of the city’s general revenue, or about $185 million.

The bill is being sponsored by Senate Appropriations Chairman Kurt Schaefer, who originally floated the idea last summer in response to Kansas City and St. Louis both pushing local minimum-wage increases over the opposition of the legislature.

Schaefer, a Columbia Republican, downplayed the minimum wage increase as a motivation for the bill in recent months, instead focusing on a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last May that faulted Maryland’s policy of providing only a partial credit for income taxes paid to other states as unconstitutional.

Schaefer says Kansas City’s and St. Louis’ earnings tax are unconstitutional because of that decision. Kansas City was excluded from the bill, he said, because local leaders made it clear they are unwilling to negotiate an end to the tax.

Additionally, Schaefer said the fact that Kansas City offers a credit for taxes paid to other cities makes its tax less “egregious.”

“Kansas City at least allows some credit to taxes in other municipalities,” Schaefer said Thursday. “St. Louis doesn’t allow any credit to anyone. So we’ll start with St. Louis.”

Senate Minority Leader Joe Keaveny, a St. Louis Democrat, said Schaefer’s logic makes no sense.

“I guess the City of St. Louis is the target of the week for Sen. Schaefer,” he said.

Critics of Schaefer have noted repeatedly that he has accepted $750,000 in campaign donations from Rex Sinquefield, the St. Louis area mega donor who spent $11 million in 2010 to bankroll a successful ballot measure that forced St. Louis and Kansas City to hold votes on the earnings tax every five years.

Despite his criticism of the motives behind the bill, Keaveny agreed with Schaefer that the earnings tax in both cities is unconstitutional unless each city offers a credit for taxes paid in other states.

St. Louis made an administrative change last week, he said, and now offers the credit.

“We’ve addressed the issue,” Keaveny said. “If Kansas City doesn’t offer a credit for out-of-state taxes paid, then they still have a constitutional problem.”

Attorneys for Kansas City vehemently disagree. They contend that because Missouri offers a credit to residents for any taxes paid in other states, Kansas City doesn’t need to. Forcing Kansas City to give residents a credit for out-of-state taxes, the city argues, would essentially be create a “double credit” that allows a resident who earns income in Kansas to pay less taxes than their neighbor who earns all of their income in Missouri.

The city’s argument is backed up by attorneys from the law firm Husch Blackwell, who provided analysis of the earnings tax that was circulated to lawmakers this week and concludes Kansas City’s tax is constitutional.

Kansas City leaders had made defeating the earnings tax repeal a top priority of the 2016 legislative session. When the public hearing on the bill was held earlier this month, the committee room was filled to capacity with Kansas City elected officials, police and firefighters, business executives and others.

Mayor Sly James was among those who testified at that hearing. He returned to the Missouri Capitol Tuesday to speak with senators in the hope of convincing them that ending the earnings tax would have dire consequences for both Kansas City and St. Louis.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay also testified against the earnings tax bill, but the amount of public opposition from the Kansas City leaders far outweighed that from St. Louis.

Despite the success, Kansas City’s earnings tax isn’t completely out of the woods just yet. Even if city leaders avoid a legislative repeal they must still convince voters to a reauthorize the tax in April when the earnings tax is placed on the citywide ballot.

Back in 2011, Kansas City voters overwhelmingly approved the five-year renewal, 78 percent to 22 percent.

Sen. Jill Schupp, a St. Louis County Democrat, argued that the state should leave it up to voters to decide whether to impose the earnings tax.

“This is the heavy hand of state government once again imposing its views without due consideration of its other options and putting St. Louis’ finances in jeopardy,” Schupp said.

Associated Press: Missouri Senate debates limiting municipal fines

Posted 5:15 pm, January 26, 2016, by Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) _ A bill capping municipal courts fines for ordinance violations has won initial approval in the Missouri Senate.

Senators debated the measure for more than two hours Tuesday before finalizing its language. It still needs a final vote before going to the House.

Bill sponsor Sen. Eric Schmitt said some cities in St. Louis County unreasonably enforce ordinance violations, such as barbequing on front lawns. He says those cities shouldn’t treat citations like a revenue stream.

His bill would place a $200 limit on fines for zoning infractions.

Democratic Sen. Jill Schupp questioned whether problems withcitations were as widespread as Schmitt claimed.

Sen. Kiki Curls, a Democrat, said the banks that own dilapidated buildings in her Kansas City district don’t need lower fines.

MissouriNet: Senator applauds indictment of Planned Parenthood video makers

January 26, 2016 by Alisa Nelson

A Texas grand jury has indicted two people who produced videos targeting Planned Parenthood, alleging the illegal selling fetal tissue. The grand jury declined to indict anyone from Planned Parenthood of the Gulf Coast — the initial target of the investigation. Senator Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) said she is not surprised.
Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur)

Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur)

“This is clearly one of those situations where an organization that someone has an ideological disagreement with is being framed. It’s all been exposed through the media. Thank goodness for the media for helping expose this and to the courts for saying we’re not going to stand by and let this happen. You’re going to be held accountable,” said Schupp.

“To me, this turns so many things on their head, including things that we’ve been doing here in the Missouri legislature. For example, had these doctored videos never been doctored and produced, we wouldn’t have a committee called the Sanctity of Life that is consistently pointing its finger at Planned Parenthood.”

Eleven states, including Missouri, launched investigations into Planned Parenthood following the videos’ release; all cleared the organization of wrongdoing.

A Missouri Senate interim committee was also formed shortly after those videos were released. The Senate committee still intends to continue meeting through this legislative session.

Associated Press: Missouri Senate debates limiting municipal fines

A bill capping municipal courts fines for ordinance violations has won initial approval in the Missouri Senate.

Senators debated the measure for more than two hours Tuesday before finalizing its language. It still needs a final vote before going to the House.

Bill sponsor Sen. Eric Schmitt said some cities in St. Louis County unreasonably enforce ordinance violations, such as barbequing on front lawns. He says those cities shouldn’t treat citations like a revenue stream.

His bill would place a $200 limit on fines for zoning infractions.

Democratic Sen. Jill Schupp questioned whether problems withcitations were as widespread as Schmitt claimed.

Sen. Kiki Curls, a Democrat, said the banks that own dilapidated buildings in her Kansas City district don’t need lower fines.

KY3: Missouri House passes voter ID measures

The Missouri House of Representatives passed two bills that would strengthen the state’s voter ID’s laws. The measures would require a voter show a photo ID, like a drivers license, before casting a ballot.

One of the bills would create a constitutional amendment, meaning, if approved by the senate, the measure would go before the voters later this year.

Supporters say the change will help fight voter fraud, and isn’t too much to ask because a vast majority of Missourians have state-issued IDs.

But critics argue the law would make voting difficult for the more than 200,000 Missourians who don’t have a drivers license.

“A lot of people are going to say I don’t know what i need, and this is just way too hard and way too much trouble and i may not go,” Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) said.

Northwest Missourian: State lawmakers plan changes to texting, driving law

Missouri is one of four states in the country that does not have an all-driver texting ban, but there is a chance that could change.

Three Missouri lawmakers are proposing a new law that would ban all motorists from texting while driving.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports state Sen. Jill Schupp is sponsoring one of the proposals. She said it makes little sense for the ban to apply only to young drivers.

However, Schupp’s legislation would allow texting if motorists use a hands-free voice-activated mode.

Call Newspaper: Republican senators petty, not to mention hypocritical

On Jan. 6 — the first day of the legislative session — Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard, R-Joplin, introduced a resolution to move reporters from the Senate floor and relegate them to an upstairs gallery overlooking the Senate, effective March 29.

The next day, Richard’s resolution was approved by a 26-4 vote — all 24 Republicans and two Democrats.

While the Republican senators’ vote is disappointing, we can’t say we’re all that surprised.

But we definitely were surprised by the votes of the two Democrats supporting the resolution — Sen. Joseph Keaveny of St. Louis and Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal of University City. Particularly disturbing is the vote by Chappelle-Nadal, supposedly a strong believer in the First Amendment — apparently for her, but not the press.

We’re pleased to report that Sen. Scott Sifton, D-Affton, was one of the four Democrats voting against the resolution. Sen. Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur, Sen. Jason Holsman of Kansas City and Sen. Jamilah Nasheed of St. Louis joined Sifton in opposing the measure.

KOLR 10: Mo. Lawmaker Proposes Stricter Regulations for In-Home Daycares Proposed Law Addresses Rules for Unlicensed Providers

A Missouri state senator has introduced a bill that would place stricter regulations on unlicensed in-home child care providers across the state.

Several at- home child care providers are unlicensed, which according to local child advocate Dana Carroll does not mean the facility isn’t providing quality care. Still, Carroll agrees with proposed legislation introduced this session by Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) that would require higher standards for such providers.

“Every day, parents place their precious children in child care and trust they’re receiving quality care from capable and loving individuals in a safe environment,” Sen. Schupp said in a press release. “There are simple steps we can take to help assure parents they have the information they need to select a qualified facility for their child.”

KOMU 8: Missouri lawmakers propose bans on texting while driving

According to the Associated Press, three Missouri lawmakers are proposing measures that would forbid all motorists from texting while driving.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports State Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur is sponsoring one of the proposals. She said it makes “little sense for the ban to apply only to young drivers.”

Although, Schupp’s legislation would permit texting if motorists use a hands-free voice-activated mode.

The Washington Missourian Editorial: The Wrong Message

The Missouri Senate has passed a rule change that would bar journalists from having access to the chamber floor.

Reporters have had a table on the Senate floor for decades to help them cover proceedings in the chamber. Under the rule change, reporters will have to cover sessions from the fourth floor public gallery.

The press table will be turned over to the Senate staff. Offices used for years by the media have been turned over to the Senate communications staff. Reporters have been moved to the fifth floor.

Senate Majority Leader Mike Kehoe, Jefferson City Republican, said these moves have been talked about for years, and staff members need more space. He said the press would still have open access to Senate proceedings. He failed to mention that the moves will make it harder for the press to cover the Senate.

Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard said he initiated the move, claiming some reporters “violated” the Senate trust by tweeting private conversations and negotiations they overheard. The only discussion cited was that the former president pro tem told the presiding senator to rein in a colleague who was getting animated during debate. Horrors!

The vote to ban the press from the Senate floor was 26-4. One of the senators who opposed the rule change was Democrat Jill Schupp, Creve Coeur, who said she liked having the press close by and didn’t think there should be an expectation of privacy in a public place. The Senate president said the floor was “not necessarily” a public place. It does belong to the taxpayers, who paid for it and maintain it. We understand there can be rules for public places, but there is no justification for the rule change in this instance.

Hannibal Courier-Post: Marion County bucks trend with decrease in deaths, injuries for 2015

Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) sponsored Senate Bill 821, which would ban all drivers from sending or receiving electronic messages while driving, unless he or she used hands-free voice recognition to send or read the message. Two similar bills were also pre-filed in the Missouri House of Representatives.

KOMU 8: Missouri lawmakers push for strict day care facilities leaves owner wanting more

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur filed a bill that would enact stricter safety requirements for in-home child care facilities.

Schupp has four key changes she would like to see happen.

Julia Parker, a local owner and operator of an in home child care facility said she is in agreement with Schupp’s bill for the most part. However, Parker would like to see stricter laws on the portion of the bill that deals with unlicensed facilities.

A portion of her bill would empower the Department of Health to close illegal operating and unlicensed facilities based on harm or imminent danger.

Associated Press: Missouri Senate Moves Media off Floor After Tweets

By Adam Aton, Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Jan 7, 2016, 5:15 PM ET

Missouri senators ordered journalists off the Senate floor Thursday after some lawmakers complained their private conversations had been tweeted.

The Senate voted 26-4 to move reporters to a visitors’ gallery overlooking the chamber in Jefferson City. Starting March 29, journalists will no longer be allowed at their longtime, 10-seat table near the Senate dais and the desks of several senators. Photographers will still be allowed on the Senate floor.

Senate President Pro Tem Ron …

Missouri Senate Audio from Jill Schupp

New Audio Available from Sen. Jill Schupp, for the Week of Jan. 4: Session Begins

http://www.senate.mo.gov/new-audio-available-from-sen-jill-schupp-for-the-week-of-jan-4-session-begins/

Interview with Show-Me Progress

Michael Bersin interviews Senator Jill Schupp in Jefferson City before the opening of the 2016 legislative session:

http://showmeprogress.com/2016/01/07/representative-jill-schupp-district-88-democrat/

KOMU TV: Mo. lawmakers head back to work to tackle some hot topics

Sen. Jill Schupp, D – St. Louis County filed a bill that would enact stricter safety requirements for in-home child care facilities. She has four key changes she would like to see happen.

Schupp wants to require children under kindergarten age related to caregivers to be counted in the total number of children being cared for at the facility. The facility would have to disclose its license status to parents or guardians of the children. The bill would also increase existing fines for making false statements about the license status or capacity of the facility. Her bill would also empower the Department of Health to close illegal operating and unlicensed facilities based on harm or imminent danger.

Columbia Daily Tribune: Subpoena fight sets tone for legislative debate on abortion

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Couer, said in a news release that the committee has uncovered no evidence fetal tissue has been mishandled.

“This committee, despite multiple hearings, subpoenas, and sunshine requests, has produced nothing to suggest Planned Parenthood has broken any laws or engaged in unethical practices,” she said. “Sadly, these facts, while inconvenient, haven’t stopped the chairman from using his committee for political gain. He’s not letting the truth get in the way of a good story.”

Action to enforce the subpoena could come quickly. Then lawmakers will turn to proposals stemming from the committee’s work, including Missouri Right to Life’s top-priority bill in response to the videos, a ban on the donation of fetal tissue from abortions for research.

Missouri Times: Sen. Schupp Finds Interim Committee on the Sanctity of Life “Deeply Troubling,” Rejects Report

State Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, today expressed frustration and disappointment with the Interim Committee on The Sanctity of Life, refusing to sign the committee’s “unilaterally-written, politically-motived” report.

“I agreed to serve on this committee because I am concerned with medical ethics irrespective of politics,” Senator Schupp explained. “The Planned Parenthood videos, while heavily edited, were troubling to me. Unfortunately, this committee has devoted little attention to its stated mission and has instead morphed into a politically motivated witch hunt.”

STL Today: Missouri state lawmakers to take another swing at ethics reform

Rep. Sheila Solon, R-Blue Springs, agrees that a two-year period would be appropriate, but others have suggested different time frames. McCreery filed legislation that would force lawmakers to wait three years after their term expires to become a lobbyist, while Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, would have elected officials wait one full session.

Schupp said she picked the one-session period because it “creates that separation without standing in the way of somebody getting a job.”

Additionally, Schupp said it would prevent a lawmaker from “one day sitting next to a person who is your colleague and the next day lobbying that same colleague.”

A revolving-door ban has the backing of Nixon.

“People leaving this place and going straight into lobbying … is not good policy,” Nixon said.

Though the NCSL reports at least 44 states impose some type of limit on campaign contributions, that change does not appear popular among lawmakers at this juncture.

But Sens. Schupp and Jason Holsman, D-Kansas City, have filed measures addressing campaign contribution limits.

Under Holsman’s measure, voters would decide whether to adopt a $2,500 limit for those running for representative, a $5,000 limit for those running for senator and a $10,000 limit for those running for statewide office. Voters also would decide on a gift ban and a one-year cooling off period.

With contribution limits, “candidates seek support from a broader base of constituents rather than a handful of wealthy donors,” Holsman said.

Schupp’s measure would set lower limits — $750 for a House of Representatives campaign, $1,500 for a Senate campaign and $5,000 for a statewide office — but it would not depend on voter approval.

“I think that people feel like elections are for sale to the highest contributor and that Missouri voices don’t matter if they don’t have a lot of money to contribute,” Schupp said.

STL Today: Lawmakers introduce bans on texting and driving

State Sen. Jill Schupp, a Creve Coeur Democrat who is sponsoring one of the proposals, said it made little sense for the ban to apply to only young drivers.

“I have literally always been puzzled by it,” Schupp said Friday. “It’s just crazy. It needs to stop.”

Schupp’s legislation would permit texting if motorists use a hands-free voice-activated mode.

The Missouri Times: Senator Jill Schupp Seeks to Improve Missouri Public Health and Safety

JEFFERSON CITY —Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, today pre-filed three pieces of legislation that would improve Missouri’s public health and safety standards. The new bills deal with seat belt enforcement, texting while driving and influenza vaccinations for healthcare facility employees.

The first bill filed today by Sen. Schupp requires all people in a passenger vehicle to wear a seat belt when the vehicle is being operated on a Missouri street or highway. Current statute only requires front seat passengers and children under 16 years of age …

STL Jewish Light: Hundreds turn out for rally to support Israel

A number of the speakers emphasized the religious and economic ties between St. Louis and the Jewish state. State Sen. Jill Schupp, who represents Creve Coeur and is Jewish, mentioned Israeli companies such as Evogene, an agricultural technology company, located at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center down the street from the rally.

“Israeli companies that have located here in our community — some of the hundreds of Israeli companies that are making important changes in the world,” said Schupp.

St. Louis Public Radio: Missouri Senate Republicans: ‘No witch hunt against Planned Parenthood’

Verbal fireworks punctuated the latest round of hearings by a Missouri Senate committee investigating Planned Parenthood’s operations in the state, which included accusations and denials that Republicans on the committee are conducting a “witch hunt.”

Chairman Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, began by stating that Tuesday’s hearing was reserved for comments from the public, which turned out to be top-heavy with official representatives from several anti-abortion groups and one citizen speaking on behalf of the National Organization for Women.

But before the first witness took the stand, Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, asked whether they would be sworn in, as were members of the Deptartment of Health and Senior Services at earlier hearings.

“Nope, this is public testimony,” Schaefer answered.

Schupp then asked, “And these witnesses are held to a different standard than the other witnesses who were brought forward?”

The Missouri Times: Sanctity of Life Committee hears testimony on abortion from the public

The Sanctity of Life Committee heard public testimony regarding the two scandals revolving around Planned Parenthood in the state of Missouri.

Testimony largely came from anti-abortion advocates, but sparks flew when Susan Gibson of the National Association for Women got into a shouting match with Sen. Bob Onder, R-St. Charles.

Gibson took serious issue with the tone and timbre of the committee’s investigation.

“I question both your understanding of what you are investigating and your ability to do so fairly and dispassionately,” she said. “It has been clear since the beginning of this witch hunt that Planned Parenthood of Missouri does not participate in the fetal tissue donation program, that you have jumped on the opportunity provided by the deceptive videos to limit access to reproductive freedom for women.”

She also criticized what she saw as the committee’s use of certain terms she considered biased, namely the use of “baby” instead of “fetus” among others. Onder jumped on that distinction.

“It’s the product of conception,” he said. “Do you know whether any physicians who do abortions in this state also have obstetrical practices. Do you think when they go back to their obstetrics offices and a woman is expecting a baby, well expecting a fetus on the ultrasound, do they refer to it as a baby or a fetus?”

However, Gibson had an ally in Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, the lone Democrat member of the committee present at the hearing Schupp credited Gibson for her testimony while also highlighting what she saw as inconsistencies with the committee’s investigation thus far.

“We’re bringing in a lot of ancillary people to discuss a lot of ancillary issues,” Schupp said. “We’re spending a lot of time and effort and energy and a lot of the people’s time and effort and energy. If we were hearing from the only people who can answer this question directly, we could have already moved on.

“We are legislators in the state of Missouri, and we haven’t even asked the people who have the answers.”

STL Today: Missouri legislative internship program still worth it despite risks, former interns say

By Alex Stuckey

JEFFERSON CITY • In 2000, Stephanie Barnes stood in front of a crowd too big for the 9-year-old to count at the state Democratic Party’s Yellow Dog Days and nervously made a proclamation about her impending run for office.

“I have a clear eye on 2020,” Barnes said to the group.

Barnes, now 24, thinks that might be a little soon — but running for office is still a goal. And she credits her 2010 internship in the Missouri Legislature, in part, for stoking her …

Associated Press: Missouri measure to end fees for Purple Heart license plates

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A new Missouri measure soon will waive fees for certain veterans who want specialty Purple Heart license plates.

Legislation signed Monday by Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon eliminated fees for Purple Heart recipients to receive the specialty plates.

The Purple Heart is given to veterans wounded or killed in combat.

Veterans honored with a Purple Heart now don’t pay additional fees for their first specialty plate, but can be fined for additional plates.

The measure will eliminate those fees once it takes effect Aug. 28. Veterans still must pay regular registration fees.

KOMU 8 News: Missouri senator wants to create suicide prevention program

JEFFERSON CITY – A Missouri senator said she’d like to create a new program for teachers.

Senator Jill Schupp submitted a bill earlier this year that would make it possible for educators to take a training course on suicide prevention. Schupp said it would give teachers an opportunity to know the signs of kids who are at risk for suicide and be able to help prevent it. It would consist of a non-mandatory training course, and it would be up to school policy to decide whether it would include elementary as well as high school kids. But, it would make it mandatory for every school district in the state to have a suicide prevention awareness policy.

Schupp said the creation of this bill came at a cost to someone in her district.

“A man in my district’s daughter committed suicide,” Schupp said. “And he came to me because he wanted to do something to help prevent future families from losing their children.”

While Schupp said the bill gained bi-partisan support in the House and the Senate, there was one slight problem.

“It didn’t pass because there was a bit of a technical error,” Schupp said. “Someone who filed an amendment attached to the bill filed the wrong version.”

Because the amendment to the bill was incorrectly filed, Schupp said they had to send it back to be fixed, but it was too late to put it on the House calendar.

Schupp said since the bill garnered so much support from both sides of the aisle from House and Senate, there would be no problem re-submitting the bill for consideration.

STL Today: Dems killed some of their own priorities when Missouri Senate shut down

JEFFERSON CITY • A bill that would have exempted some bed-and-breakfast establishments from paying higher taxes was among the casualties of last month’s Missouri Senate meltdown.

State Rep. Michael Butler, D-St. Louis, had attached the B&B provision to a Senate bill. It was poised for passage after a 10-member House-Senate conference committee signed off on it.

But Senate Democrats killed the bill — and scores of others, including some of their own pet causes — by filibustering nearly everything on the agenda during the final week of the session that ended May 15.

Democrats were protesting Republicans’ use of a rare procedural maneuver to pass “right to work” legislation, which would bar unions from collecting fees from nonmembers to cover collective bargaining and other costs.

“That was the worst part of session,” Butler said. “I’m working very hard to make sure those B&Bs stay in business.”

Butler wanted to protect B&Bs in St. Louis from a move to tax them at commercial rates. St. Louis Assessor Freddie Dunlap notified B&Bs that are paying at residential rates that a state law on the books since 1995 allows the property to be assessed commercially if it’s used for “transient housing.”

Under Butler’s amendment, the inns would have remained in the residential category if the owner lived there and rented out four or fewer rooms.

Mayor Francis Slay’s office has said he is not interested in putting a new burden on businesses in the city. In the absence of a change in the law, the mayor’s staff is reviewing the options and expects “to have it resolved by the end of next week,” Maggie Crane, the mayor’s spokeswoman, said in an email.

Along with the B&B provision, the Senate filibuster stymied 14 other bills that had been negotiated in conference committees but needed a final vote in each chamber.

They dealt with everything from suicide prevention and public schools’ gifted programs to government employees’ pensions and sexual trafficking of a child.

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, sponsored the suicide prevention proposal. She said it grew out of her conversation with a St. Louis County father whose daughter committed suicide last year.

The bill aimed to increase educators’ awareness of the signs of depression by providing voluntary training. Though it had near-unanimous support in both chambers, the measure got stuck in the Senate logjam because an error inserted by the House had to be fixed, Schupp said.

“We had to send it back to conference to strip out the wrong version” of a House anti-bullying amendment, she said. “Because the Senate virtually didn’t move forward on any bills those last days, it never came back for a vote on the Senate floor.”

Schupp said she was sad to see the bill die but “I feel pretty confident we can move it forward next year.”

The bill with the B&B amendment was SB115. The suicide prevention provision was in SB328. Other bills that died with signed conference reports awaiting votes were: SB13, SB35, SB152, SB172, SB221, SB270, SB278, SB282, SB283, SB300, SB446, HB152 and HB458. (Virginia Young)

STL Today: Vacation in Missouri? Schupp to visit colleagues’ turf

Sen. Jill Schupp is planning her summer vacation, but she’s not heading to a faraway, exotic locale.

The Creve Coeur Democrat is plotting a 30-day, off-and-on itinerary that includes visits to nearly every Senate district in the state. She said the trips will help her better understand the state’s diversity — and her 33 colleagues.

“I am really excited,” Schupp said. “Missouri is an amazing place, geographically, business-wise.”

Raw Story: Missouri’s GOP-dominated statehouse clamps down on bleeding heart cities that might raise minimum wage

Concerned that some of the state’s more liberal municipalities might pass legislation they don’t like, Republicans in the Missouri statehouse are preemptively pushing to make bag taxes and wage increases illegal throughout the state.

On Tuesday, Missouri legislators passed a bill “to prevent cities from banning plastic bags and stop them from raising the minimum wage,” the Associated Press reports. Twenty-four senators voted in favor of the legislation; 10 senators voted against it.

AP: Republicans in Missouri Senate push to rein in city actions

Missouri’s GOP-led Senate expanded a House bill on Tuesday that would ban municipalities from barring the use of plastic bags and also stop cities and towns from increasing their minimum wage — a move some Democrats criticized as inhibiting local control.

KRCG: Suicide-prevention bill breezes through House committee

A bill requiring school districts to develop suicide-prevention training is one step closer to law after a unanimous committee vote Monday.

The bill would require every school district in Missouri to create a youth suicide awareness and prevention training program for its employees by July of 2017. It leaves specific policy decisions up to individual districts, but every policy would need to include ways to identify and help students at risk of suicide as well as procedures for dealing with a suicide death.

On Monday, a House committee unanimously sent the measure to a floor vote without any amendments. Bill sponsor Sen. Jill Schupp, D-St. Louis, said that action left her feeling very hopeful about the bill’s prospects.

Schupp said she introduced the bill after a 17-year-old girl in her district committed suicide last May. Schupp worked on the bill with the girl’s parents and introduced it at the start of the session in January.

KC Star: Kansas and Missouri move to tighten welfare rules

Critics of the legislation, however, say those who reach the lifetime limits typically face significant barriers to employment, such as lack of education, unstable housing or mental and physical health problems.

A 2013 study by the University of Maine found that families kicked off TANF because of exceeding lifetime benefits in that state experienced increased reliance on food banks, inability to pay utility and other bills, and overcrowded housing conditions or reliance on homeless shelters.

“Our state should be protecting low-income children — not cutting holes in the social safety net and watching the kids fall through,” said Missouri Sen. Jill Schupp, a St. Louis County Democrat.

Missouri House rejects Senate version of $26.1 billion state budget

There was less debate on the other budget bills. An amendment to the Higher Education budget bill was offered by Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, that would have eliminated language barring financial aid to undocumented college students. That amendment also failed.

The state budget now goes back to the Missouri House. Both chambers have until May 8 to send a final version to Gov. Jay Nixon. Republican leaders are trying, however, to pass the state budget by April 30 to force Nixon, a Democrat, to sign or veto any provisions while the legislature is still in session.

That would give the GOP-controlled House and Senate the chance to override any vetoes before the 2015 session ends and would effectively prevent Nixon from rallying support during the summer months for his vetoes to be upheld, a tactic that has worked well for him in recent years.

Missouri lawmaker seeks suicide prevention programs

A bill aimed at increasing suicide prevention programs in Missouri schools passed out of the Missouri State Senate Education Committee on March 4.

The bill would require schools to implement resources and programs to raise suicide awareness and prevention.

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, introduced Senate Bill 328 with the goal of lowering youth suicides in Missouri.

“Missouri has a higher youth suicide rate than the nation as a whole, and this legislation is being broadly supported because people are recognizing a problem that needs to be addressed,” Schupp said in an email.

Northwest Missourian: New suicide prevention bill aims to inform school districts

Rising suicide rates in Missouri have lawmakers searching for an answer. A new bill may be the first step in preventing these tragic circumstances.

Senator Jill Schupp sponsors the bill known as “Youth Suicide Awareness and Prevention Education.” Created in two parts, it would require the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to create a model plan. From there, individual districts would use DESE’s plan to create their own strategy.

“It’s designed to help teachers and administrators get training through the school …

MU law professor highlights ‘serious problems’ in Missouri dealth penalty process

Geoff West, Columbia Missourian

COLUMBIA ­— Two bipartisan state bills focusing on death penalty reform — Senate Bill 393 and House Bill 561 — have more to do with fixing “serious problems” affecting the entire Missouri criminal justice system and less to do with the morality of executions, MU law professor Paul Litton said Thursday.

Litton was co-chair of an eight-member team of prominent Missouri jurists tasked by the American Bar Association with studying potential flaws in the fairness and accuracy of the state’s capital justice system. …

AP: Missouri Senate passes cutoff for changes to ballot measures

Summer Balentine, Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Missouri ballot measures would need to be finalized earlier if legislation passed by the Senate on Thursday is signed into law, an effort to save money on reprinting ballots that last year cost the state close to $680,000.

The bill, approved 26-8, would set a deadline to change ballot measures about two months before an election, which is two weeks sooner than the generally accepted standard.

Current law allows measures to be finalized at any point within 180 days of …

Jefferson News Tribune Opinion: Intensify prevention of youth suicide

State legislation to increase awareness and prevention of youth suicide has won our support.

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, has filed a bill with two components.

• One would require school districts to adopt a policy regarding youth suicide by July 1, 2017. School districts could adopt or modify a model policy the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education would be required to develop by July 1, 2016.

• Teachers may elect to take up to two hours of training regarding youth suicide and count those hours toward professional development required for state certification.

We questioned whether the state law might: duplicate district policies; usurp parental responsibilities; or erode teaching by saddling educators with more social service responsibilities?

Any reservations were allayed by conversations with both the senator and Gretchen Guitard, assistant superintendent for staff services at the Jefferson City Public Schools.

Schupp said her bill “puts no requirements on teachers. This bill simply adds youth suicide prevention and awareness training to the list of options that educators can choose from when picking which professional development courses to take …”

AP: Missouri bill aimed at youth suicide prevention, awareness

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — School districts would be required to create policies addressing youth suicide awareness and prevention under a Missouri bill.

Legislation introduced by state Sen. Jill Schupp this week would also require the education department to create a model policy that could be implemented statewide.

The Creve Coeur (kreev koor) Democrat says the legislation is meant to address and help prevent suicide deaths among Missouri youth. She says teachers need training to recognize signs of students at risk of suicide.

Districts would need to implement prevention policies by July 2017.

Teachers also could receive education in suicide awareness as part of annual training.

Big 550 KTRS: Youth Suicide Awareness And Prevention Focus Of Missouri Bill

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) – School districts would be required to create policies addressing youth suicide awareness and prevention under a Missouri bill. Legislation introduced by state Sen. Jill Schupp this week would also require the education department to create a model policy that could be implemented statewide. The Creve Coeur Democrat says the legislation […]

Mixed Opinions on Texting, Driving Ban

There are two bills filed in the Missouri Senate to ban texting while driving for all ages.

The current law prohibits people under 21 and commercial drivers from using hand-held devices to text and drive.

Drivers of commercial vehicles also are prohibited from using handheld cellphones to make phone calls while driving.

Other than expanding the texting and driving ban for motorists of all ages, one of the bills would also ban all drivers from using handheld devices to make phone calls.

That bill was filed by state Sen. David Pearce, R-Warrensburg, and the other one that just applies to texting was filed by state Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur.

The Missouri Times: Same building, new job: Jill Schupp on 2015 and beyond

When she first ran for office, the state of Missouri had limits on individual campaign contributions. As she approaches her first term as Missouri Senator from the 24th district, Jill Schupp is hoping to resurrect those same limits.

“We saw the race between myself and Jay Ashcroft get so expensive,” Schupp said. “Big players with a lot of money to spend got involved, and I don’t think the people of Missouri want individuals or groups to be able to buy the legislature.”

Stay Tuned Election Wrap Up

Stay Tuned Election Wrap Up with input from participants around the St. Louis area

We Asked Six Questions About Mid-Term Elections; Here Are The Answers

State Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, was one of the few Democratic bright spots on Tuesday. She won a hotly-contested race for the 24th District Senate seat.

Schupp takes Missouri Senate seat but Republicans expand legislative majorities

A notable exception was in the 24th Senate District in St. Louis County, where Jill Schupp prevailed despite the famous name of her opponent, Republican Jay Ashcroft.

Six Things At Stake In Tuesday’s Mid-Term Election

n the 24th state Senate district in central St. Louis County, state Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, is running against Republican attorney Jay Ashcroft for an open seat. The incumbent, John Lamping, R-Ladue, decided not to run again.

State Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, is locked in a competitive battle against Republican Jay Ashcroft.

Jill Schupp: “Let’s Move Forward in a Different Direction”

The race offers the chance for a rare pickup for Democrats in the State Senate. Schupp, a former Ladue School Board Member, Creve Coeur City Councilwoman and for the past six years, State Representative has been campaigning tirelessly across the district as a progressive voice.

Missouri News, Views, and Issues

He has been so noncommittal that the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s Virginia Young concluded that “his positions on issues often seem under development.”

Accusations fly over Missouri’s sexual offender laws as election nears

Schupp “has a very excellent record on protecting children. She served on the Children’s Trust Fund board, and I’ve met few people who have the kind of commitment she has to Missouri’s children.”

Stenger faces Stream on Nov. 4 ballot

Three state Senate races will be on the ballot. Democratic State Rep. Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur will run against Republican Jay Ashcroft to succeed state Sen. John Lamping, a Republican of Ladue.

Most notably, Schupp has a track record of strongly advocating for expanding Medicaid, while Ashcroft has not taken a stance on the federal healthcare plan. The son of well-known conservative father — former U.S. Attorney General and Missouri Governor John Ashcroft – Jay has said he favors tax cuts over tax credits for special interests.

VIDEO: Missouri’s 24th Senatorial District Debate and Wrap-up

Missouri Times

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

By Scott Faughn

View Original Story Here

Rep. Jill Schupp and Jay Ashcroft square off on the issues. Moderated by Scott Faughn, publisher of The Missouri Times.

St. Louis County race is key battleground for Missouri Senate

She has been even more vocal in advocating for Medicaid expansion and was recognized in July by the St. Louis Regional Chamber for her leadership on that issue.

Despite her differences with GOP leaders, she said, she has reached across party lines to get things done — for example, when she passed a provision that helped motorists who were being ticketed for having bike racks that obscured their license plates.

Missouri GOP veto-proof majority in voters’ hands

“Each time we do that and get one step closer to restoring a balance, we move closer to making better decisions for the state as a whole.” Ashcroft did not return calls from The Associated Press.

Editorial: Care about Medicaid expansion? Vote for Jill Schupp

You want jobs in the 24th District? You support Medicaid expansion. Period. End of story.
There is only one candidate who fits that bill, and that’s Democrat Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur.

We endorse Ms. Schupp to be the next state senator from the 24th District.

Her experience, her clear positions on Medicaid expansion and a variety of other issues, and the Senate’s desperate need for more ideological balance make Ms. Schupp the clear choice over political newcomer Jay Ashcroft, a Republican from unincorporated west St. Louis County.

Battles For Two Area State Senate Seats Attract Cash, Controversy

“Finding solutions to the problems we face and working with people across the aisle have always been the way that I’ve worked best,” Schupp said on a recent edition of the Politically Speaking podcast. “But we’ve also seen the past six years that I’ve been in the legislature, the extremists have set the agenda. And the things coming out of Jefferson City are very extreme pieces of legislation.

“This Girl Is On Fire” video by Jo Ann Brown

YouTube

By Jo Ann Brown

View Original Video 

Politically Speaking: Schupp Lays Out Views In Bid For Missouri Senate

This week the Politically Speaking podcast crew welcomes Jill Schupp, the Democratic candidate for the state Senate in the 24th District.

10 Questions with Jill Schupp

As part of our ongoing election coverage, we asked the Democratic state senate candidate Jill Schupp 10 questions.

Jill Schupp is a Champion for the Middle Class She Supports Small Businesses and Quality Education for All

Jefferson City, MO – Jill Schupp is running for State Senate to protect middle class families, fight for small business owners and make education a priority.

Missouri State Rep. Jill Schupp on Ritenour Legislative Advocacy Committee

Parkway Alumni Association announces Hall of Fame inductees

This year’s inductees include graduates who are familiar to many St. Louisans, including Central High grads Max Scherzer, pitcher for the Detroit Tigers and Randy and Jason Sklar, comedians and web/television/radio hosts; State Rep. and North High grad Jill Schupp (MO-88) and West High grad James (Jim) Fiala, chef and owner of The Crossing in Clayton and Acero in Maplewood. Other honorees include graduates who are prominent in the fields of medicine, education, fine arts, business, media and the military.

Big money on both sides for Missouri state Senate’s 24th district

Republican John “Jay” Ashcroft received nearly $200,000 in contributions just a day after he won the Republican nomination for the 24th District Missouri State Senate seat. And he’ll face a Democrat, Jill Schupp, who has raised even more.

Can The Ashcroft Name Catch Fire In A Democratic-Leaning Senate District?

His general election opponent – state Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur – is considered a solid fundraiser and campaigner. And it’s likely Missouri Democrats will invest heavily to elect Schupp, since the seat offers one of the few chances for Democrats to win a seat currently held by a Republican.

Supporting the environment: Jewish Light Letters to the editor: July 23, 2014

I am writing to ask readers of the Jewish Light to consider supporting Jill Schupp in the election for state senator in Missouri’s 24th District. As a state representative, Schupp has had a good record of supporting the needs of people in her district and, of great importance to me, supporting environmental issues.

2014 Parkway Alumni Hall of Fame Invitation

Click here to purchase tickets online for the 2014 Hall of Fame Dinner and Celebration,
or call 314-415-8074.

Parkway Alumni Association
455 N. Woods Mill Road
Chesterfield, MO 63017
Phone: 314-415-8074
Update your contact information with the Parkway Alumni Association by visiting
www.ParkwayAlumni.org and clicking on the “Update” link.

We Asked Five Questions About Campaign Finance Reports. Here Are The Answers

For example: State Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, took in $225,000 in the past quarter. Unlike the three Republicans running for the 24th District seat, Schupp is unopposed this August – which means she can use her roughly $460,000 of cash on hand to take on whoever wins the GOP nomination. (Of the three candidates, Jay Ashcroft outraised Jack Spooner and Robb Hicks by a large amount.)

Major Parties Bringing In Top Guns For 24th District Senate Fight

State Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, has no primary opposition for her party’s nomination. Even so, she is unveiling on Tuesday a long bipartisan list of prominent backers for her bid for the seat.

Missouri backs criminal checks for health advisers

Though sponsored by Republicans, the new Missouri bill requiring background checks gained support from numerous Democrats.

“I’m OK with some vetting of who the navigators are. It’s just good public policy,” said Democratic Rep. Jill Schupp, of suburban St. Louis.

Bill that bans the sale of e-cigarettes to minors wins House approval

Vapor cigarettes are marketed in suggestive television and print ads, and some brands have candy flavors. That should make people wary of them, said Rep. Jill Schupp, D- Creve Coeur.

“These are nicotine products, and we don’t know the dangers associated with them yet,” she said.

Missouri lawmakers pass e-cigarette regulations

“It pre-empts our opportunity to ensure that our young people don’t become tomorrow’s addicts,” said Rep. Jill Schupp, a Creve Coeur Democrat.

The American Cancer Society estimates that almost 30 other states have passed measures similar to Missouri’s that prevent e-cigarette sales to kids but don’t subject the devices to the same regulations as tobacco products.

Legislature Proposes Regulation of Electronic Cigarettes

“We know for a fact that the way [teens have] stopped smoking cigarettes happens when we increase the tax on cigarettes, we move the cigarettes behind the counter in stores where they are sold,” says Schupp.

Measure barring minors from e-cigarette purchases sent to Missouri governor

Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, said on the House floor Monday that this definition and exemption from regulations applying to tobacco products could limit the ability of the FDA to impose future regulations on e-cigarettes. She called it a “pre-emptive strike” against the FDA’s authority.

“Even though the FDA did come out with regulations that increase the taxes on e-cigarette products we need to leave the door open,” Schupp said. “We know it takes more than just not selling these products to 18 year olds to stop young people from smoking.”

Lawmakers finalize state budget that includes education funding increases

ixon asked lawmakers to use $1.7 billion in federal aid, available under the 2010 Affordable Care Act, to expand coverage. With Republicans dominating both chambers, expansion has found few friends in the majority party.

“It is not just a fiscal issue, it is a moral issue,” said Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Couer. “It says do we care enough about our neighbors that when they get ill they have a place to go.”

Schupp Honored by United 4 Children

State Rep. Jill Schupp has been given a Lighting the Way award by the United 4 Children organization. She was honored for championing Nathan’s Law, a Missouri day care safety bill named after Nathan Blecha, who died in 2007 at age 3 months after accidentally suffocating in a portable crib at an unlicensed home day care facility. Schupp, a Democrat from Creve Coeur, is a member of Congregation Shaare Emeth.

Missouri House Amends, Then Passes, Student Transfer Fix

“We are greatly underfunded in our (K-12) foundation formula,” McNeil said. “If we think it’s difficult right now to get the funds, wait until we have kicked this door open and have included funding for private school students … it will find its way into school districts all over this state.”

State Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, also weighed in, saying that school children would be used as shields in a war on public schools.

“We cannot use our kids as hostages to undermine public education by undermining the funding to public education,” Schupp said.

Missouri House endorses student transfer bill

A proposal to overhaul a Missouri school transfer law won state House approval Wednesday after lawmakers pared back provisions that could allow some students to attend a private school at local taxpayers’ expense.

Some Democrats criticized the private school portion. “It’s about sending money, public tax dollars, to private schools,” said Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur.

Medicaid bill wins symbolic vote, inches forward in Mo. House

Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, praised Molendorp.

“I think it’s great that he’s doing it,” she said. “I wish it was more likely to move forward.”

Missouri House passes payday loan changes

Opponents said the bill doesn’t solve the problem of borrowers securing loans from multiple lenders at the same time. They argued for more restrictions on lenders to ensure they aren’t loaning money to clients who can’t afford the interest and fees.

“The bill is a wolf in sheep’s clothing that will keep people trapped in debt and moving into bankruptcy to the detriment of all of us,” said Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur.

Missouri House approves expansion of castle doctrine

Rep. Jill Schupp of the 88th district was one of the minority that voted against the bill. She says she’s concerned that giving people a pass to shoot and kill someone would create a “Wild West scenario” in Missouri.

“If they feel that their life is being threatened, then of course they need to take steps to protect themselves and their families,” she said.

E-cigarette debate lights up House. Bill barring sales to minors passes.

The bill also includes a provision that the devices, also known as e-cigarettes, “shall not be taxed or otherwise regulated as tobacco products.” The language, which was not in the bill as filed by Rowden, was added by the House General Laws Committee when it sent the bill to the floor for debate.

“I want to know where this came from,” Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, asked Rowden during debate. “Where did this additional language that was not in the bill that was heard come from, Gentleman?”

Missouri to Bar Teenagers from Buying E-Cigarettes

But each of the bills passed by the House and Senate would also exempt e-cigarettes from the state’s 17-cent per pack cigarette tax and state that they could not be regulated as tobacco products.

“This shuts the door on regulation that we may want to see going forward as a tobacco product,” said Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur.

Minors banned from buying e-cigarettes under bills passed by Missouri lawmakers

In the House, Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Couer, charged that this would prevent any regulations on these products and that the language was pushed by the tobacco industry.

“We are precluding this from any future taxation or regulation as tobacco products,” Schupp said. “We are letting these companies off the hook.”

E-Cigarette Bills Pass Missouri House And Senate On Same Day

House Bill 1690 and Senate Bill 841would both limit the sales of these devices, sometimes called e-cigarettes, to consumers 18 years old and older, and both versions would not subject the devices to regulation or taxation as tobacco products.
That provision drew the ire of several Democrats in the House, including state Rep. Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur.

Missouri House Approves E-Cigarette Restriction

Representative Jill Schupp, (D-Creve Coeur), said the legislation shuts the door to regulation. “Why we would want to start now by saying we will have no regulations around this as it relates to tobacco products makes no sense to me,” said Schupp.

“If our goal here today is truly to stop young people from accessing these E-cigarettes as we learn more about what their effects will be, we can do that without this [language] in the bill.”

House resoundingly defeats anti-bicycle amendment; Victory of the decade for bicycling in Jefferson City

Key leadership in opposing this amendment was provided by many Representatives from across the political spectrum. Representatives who had heard from their constituents were fired up to defend bicycling, and did so with eloquence and passion.

For their leadership, we would especially like to thank Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur), Genise Montecillo (D-St. Louis), John Rizzo (D-Kansas City), Jacob Hummel(D-St. Louis), Dave Hinson (R-St. Clair, sponsor of the transportation funding proposal in the House), Dave Schatz (R-Sullivan), Ed Schieffer (D-Troy), Karla May (D-St Louis), Nate Walker (R-Kirksville), Jeff Justus (R-Branson), Michael Frame (D-Eureka), and John Diehl(R-Town & Country).

Missouri House gives early nod to replacing Common Core

Rep. Jill Schupp, R-Creve Coeur, said student rights to religious expression are already constitutionally protected.

“This does not need to be done and our children’s religious freedom is not going to suffer because we don’t pass one more unnecessary bill,” Schupp said.

Mo. Senate Committee strips funding for takeover of Ozark National Scenic Riverways from fiscal year ’15 budget

Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, tried multiple times to strip this funding from the budget, but failed each time. She reasoned that the state did not have the money or staff to care for the park adequately.

Republicans Vie To Keep Control Of Democratic-Leaning District

Ashcroft will have to get past two other Republican candidates in a primary. And if he prevails, he’ll face state Rep. Jill Schupp – a Creve Coeur Democrat with a reputation as a solid campaigner and fundraiser.

For her part, Schupp isn’t taking anything for granted – especially when Republicans could easily ship money to the winner of the primary. But she likes the prospect of a vigorous GOP primary in the Democratic-leaning district.

House finishes debate on budget

Medicaid expansion remained the most divisive budget issue. The bill authorizing spending on the Department of Social Services, which oversees Medicaid, passed on a 99-52 vote, the only budget bill to receive fewer than 100 favorable votes.

“We are turning our backs on the people of the state of Missouri who are the working poor,” said Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur.

New protections for breastfeeding could come soon (Includes Video)

Missouri House Bill No. 1320 gives nursing moms statewide protection against the state’s definition of sexual conduct and laws governing indecent exposure.

The bill also removes the ability of Missouri’s towns and cities from enacting ordinances contrary to the provisions outlined in the bill.

Bill co-sponsor Jill Schupp (D) is calling the House’s 150-0 approval of the measure a victory for mothers as well as the criminal justice system.

Missouri House passes $26.6 billion budget

The absence of Medicaid expansion in the budget also sparked debate in the chamber, with Democrats highlighting what they say are potential problems without expansion.

Rep. Sue Allen, R-Town and Country, said Medicaid “is a big monster, and we’re working to control it and reform it.” In response, Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, pointed to 260,000 Missourians who would go without health care because they couldn’t afford it.

“One person’s big monster is another person’s lifesaver,” Schupp said.

Missouri House Approves Budget For FY2015

“Ladies and gentlemen, when rural hospitals close, actions here today will be remembered,” said Schupp. “I have a list of over 100 organizations from communities all over the state – these are all the groups that say, ‘it’s time to expand Medicaid.’”

Singing for your supper; collaborative’s new direction

In October of last year, a new Missouri law made it legal to celebrate Christmas in public schools. Specifically, the law stated, “any state or local governmental entity; public building, park or school; or public setting or place is not allowed to ban or restrict the practice, mention, celebration, or discussion of any federal holiday” including Christmas.

At the time, I wrote about the new law and quoted Rep. Jill Schupp, who said it was “a terrible piece of legislation.” Schupp, a Jewish Democrat from Creve Coeur, added, “It’s under the pretense of providing freedoms to everyone to celebrate what they want. But it’s really just about celebrating Christmas.”

House Takes up Missouri Budget Debate Today

Representative Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) has filed an amendment that would accept federal dollars for Medicaid expansion. She offered such an amendment in the House Budget Committee but it was voted down by the Committee’s Republicans.

Mo. House Blocks Medicaid Expansion, Sets Aside $6M For New State Park, While Approving State Budget

“Ladies and gentlemen, when rural hospitals close, (your) actions here today will be remembered,” Schupp said. “I have a list of over 100 organizations from communities all over the state – the Chillicothe Chamber of Commerce, the Kennett Chamber (of Commerce), the Sedalia Area Chamber of Commerce, the Missouri Optometric Association, the Dental Association, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, the list goes on and on – these are all the groups that say, ‘it’s time to expand Medicaid.'”

Missouri House endorses fiscal year 2015 budget

The state could only take over operation of the riverways if the National Park Service relinquished control.

The $6 million appropriated for this take over can only be tapped if the fiscal year’s revenue growth exceeds the Legislature’s estimate of 4.2 percent.

Attempt to add Medicaid expansion to House budget proposal

“I take advantage of every opportunity I have to talk about the importance of the expansion of Medicaid in the state of Missouri. Our hospitals – particularly our rural hospitals – our social workers, our Missouri Chamber, our doctors, our do-gooders and most importantly the people of Missouri have said, ‘Do this. Take care of the people in need. Do it now because time is wasting.’”

Missouri House panel backs budget with two-tier funding for schools, limits on college tuition

By barring those students from paying the lower tuition afforded to Missouri residents, “we are standing in the way of someone going on to get a college education” said Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur.

NORC Newsletter: A Message From Representative Jill Schupp, District 88

Dear NORC Friends and Neighbors,

Has it really been ten years? The more years I’ve enjoyed, the faster they all seem to go!

Missouri House Committee Passes State Budget For FY2015

House budget writers have passed Missouri’s state budget for Fiscal Year 2015, which begins July 1.
The roughly $28 billion spending plan still includes a funding increase for the state’s K-12 schools, which would be around $122 million if projections by House and Senate Republican leaders turn out to be correct. If Gov. Jay Nixon’s rosier revenue picture turns out to be correct, then K-12 spending would increase by $278 million.

Missouri House Passes Supplemental Budget; Includes $5M For Normandy Schools

House Bill 2014 includes $5 million for the unaccredited Normandy School District in St. Louis County, which has said it would go broke before the end of the current school year without the money. About a fourth of Normandy students have transferred to other districts, and the district still has to pay their tuition and in some cases their transportation as well.

NCJW takes leading role in bill supporting victims of domestic violence

The Missouri General Assembly is considering legislation that would mandate unpaid time off for victims of domestic violence to attend court dates. NCJW has taken a leading role in fighting for the bill, which it has been working on for about two years as part of a coalition of domestic violence service providers.

Proposed jury duty exemption stirs discussion of breastfeeding age limit (Includes Audio)

Representative Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) was not convinced that an age limit is a good idea. “I just think that this is … talk about a sacred bond between a mother and a child and a great gift that a mother gives to her child in terms of good health and nutrition for the life of the child. I can’t believe that we’re thinking about putting what I would call some kind of arbitrary limits on this.”

After baby’s death in Perry County, parents seek answers

State Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, said state officials should be striving to get more information out about what goes on in unregulated home day cares. Schupp has been trying to strengthen Missouri’s day care safety laws. Last year she said her staff encountered multiple roadblocks when obtaining records to document the circumstances behind child deaths in Missouri’s unlicensed home day cares.

Missouri Law Defending Christmas Sparks Concern

A new Missouri law authorizing public schools and local governments to celebrate Christmas any way they wish has raised concerns that it will give educators license to openly proselytize in the classroom.

Christmas displays, celebrations in public schools OK under new state law

Come this holiday season, celebrating Christmas any way any Missourian wants to on public property — be it singing “Silent Night” as part of a public school activity or displaying a nativity scene outside a city hall — will be perfectly legal, according to state law. That’s because on Oct. 11, 2013, a new Missouri law went into effect that says “any state or local governmental entity; public building, park or school; or public setting or place is not allowed to ban or restrict the practice, mention, celebration, or discussion of any federal holiday” including Christmas.

Politically Speaking: Rep. Schupp On The Future Of Tax And Gun Bills, Medicaid And Her Senate Race (Includes Audio)

On this week’s show, Missouri Rep. Jill Schupp joins us. Schupp was one of the more outspoken Democrats during September’s veto session. We talk to her about what she thinks the future of two bills she spoke out against: the income tax cut bill and the nullification bill. We touch on Medicaid expansion’s chances in next session, and go into detail on her upcoming race for state senate.

Coverage gap leaves up to 7 million ineligible for Medicaid

Coverage gap leaves up to 7 million ineligible for Medicaid October 02, 2013 by CBNews.com Coverage gap leaves up to 7 million ineligible for Medicaid (CBS News) NEW YORK — The Affordable Care Act hoped to cover more poor Americans by requiring states to expand Medicaid, but 26 states declined to go to that expense,

Volunteer-driven project founded by Rep. Jill Schupp interviews 500th Veteran

World War II POW Robert Weinberg is one of 500 military veterans interviewed by the Missouri Veterans History Project.
The non-profit marks a major milestone this month after collecting the oral history of its 500 military veterans.

Schupp Announces 500th Interview For Missouri Veterans History Project

Representative Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) has announced that volunteers of the Missouri Veterans History Project have recorded the 500th interview of a Missouri Veteran. The videotaped stories are archived by the Library of Congress and the State Historical Society of Missouri.

Rep. Jill Schupp Launches State Senate Candidacy by Asking Voters Whether Their Priorities Align with Legislative Actions

Rep. Jill Schupp (D-88th) has launched her campaign for the 24th District of Missouri State Senate by asking voters whether their priorities align with actions taken by the General Assembly in recent sessions.

“I ask the voters of the 24th District whether the people of Missouri can trust their elected officials to do what’s right,” she said.

Schupp launches bid for 24th District Senate seat in contest attracting statewide buzz

As she launched her bid for the state Senate, Democrat Jill Schupp sharply condemned the Republican-controlled General Assembly as being “nearly dysfunctional’’ and “off-the-wall extreme” – which she asserted made it more crucial that outnumbered Democrats begin to snatch back power.

Mo Lawmakers Lost Major Federal Funding For Healthcare, Jobs

Schupp said that by not taking action, Missouri lawmakers lost an entire year of 100 percent of federal funding for healthcare to low income Missourians and they lost the state more than 20-thousand jobs.

Schupp to declare bid for 24th District state Senate seat, with Koster at her side

State Rep. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, is planning to announce June 13 that she will seek in 2014 the 24th District state Senate seat now occupied by Republican John Lamping.

Missouri Project preserving the memories of veterans

The Missouri Veterans History Project was created and funded as part of a State preservation project and spearheaded by State Rep. Jill Schupp.

House Gives Initial Approval to $25 Billion Budget, Medicaid Expansion Rejected

The Missouri House is poised to send the Senate a $25 billion budget that does not include Medicaid expansion.

Mo. Female Reps Ignored on Contraception Debate

Seven female representatives voiced outrage at being ignored by Republican House leadership during a discussion on a resolution to President Barack Obama’s contraception mandate.

Missouri veterans’ stories to be archived for the public

There are many veterans who have a story to tell, and some who think they don’t. But the Missouri Veterans History Project wants a record of them all.

On this Veterans Day, they conducted 30 minute taped interviews of as many Missouri Veterans as they could line up. The interviews will be archived for future generations.

STLCC Students, Local Legislators Receive MCCA Awards

Mo. Sen. Eric Schmitt (R-Glendale) and Mo. Rep. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) each received the Missouri Community College Association’s Distinguished Legislator Award at a ceremony in Branson today. The awards were presented in recognition of their support for St. Louis Community College and community colleges throughout the state.

Veterans History Project Underway

The Missouri Veterans History Project (MVHP) interviews and records the stories of Missouri veterans. The vision for this not-for-profit corporation originated with Rep. Jill Schupp-D, Creve Coeur, after 2010 budget cuts eliminated the Missouri Veterans Stories, a state-funded program.

Nursing Education Incentive Program bill passes through Missouri House

Partisanship aside, Missouri House Democrats and Republicans came together in unanimous support of combined House Bills 223 and 231, pertaining to a new Nursing Education Incentive Program for higher education.

Tax break for small businesses passes House

“This is not an incentive for business to create a new job,” Rep. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur) tells colleagues. “This is a bill about headlines. This is sprinkling fairy dust over a problem. This is imaginary, not real.”